april, 2018

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22jan - 18mayAll DayRohini Ralby: 4Squares

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Event Details

Stevenson University will host the work of Owings Mills-based painter Rohini Ralby from January 22 through May 18 in the Art Gallery on the University’s Greenspring Campus, 1525 Greenspring Valley Road, Stevenson, MD 21153.

A public reception will take place Thursday, February 15, from 5:30-7:00p.m. On Thursday April 12, from 5:45-6:15pm, the artist will be giving a talk. Both events are free and the community is encouraged to attend.

Color. Rhythm. Space. Value. Stroke. Each element contributes its own composition to the whole, and all must integrate to form a successful painting. Ralby brings to her work a masterful understanding of this integration, drawn from a range of disciplines.

In addition to studying Chinese calligraphy, Ralby trained in Tai Chi Chuan with T. R. Chung, disciple of Kuo Lien Ying. During her undergraduate years at Washington University in St. Louis, she worked with Leslie Laskey, Annelise Mertz, and Nelson Wu. After earning her M.A. in dance at Mills College, she established herself as a well-known Tai Chi Chuan teacher in Cambridge, MA, before becoming a close personal disciple of Swami Muktananda Paramahamsa, who instructed her one-on-one in internal contemplative practice. In 2012, Bancroft Press published Ralby’s book Walking Home with Baba: The Heart of Spiritual Practice.

Ralby works at the confluence of multiple artistic and spiritual traditions. Like all her teachers, she focuses on where within the artist an artwork emerges; to allow art to manifest from the deepest levels, one has to go beyond technique.

In 2011, Ralby returned to her brush and blades and began working with oils on paper, canvas, and panel. The resulting compositions vibrate at the frequencies that underlie conventional signification. Her pictorial languages have evolved with her contemplative and artistic practice. Ralby’s paintings, which consist of four panels each, depict the vibrations of each component in a semantic field of four qualities, which Ralby has termed a fourchotomy; for this reason, the paintings are called Foursquares.

For more information about Stevenson’s arts and cultural events, contact Lori Rubeling, exhibition curator at [email protected] or 443-394-9547.

Stevenson University, known for its distinctive career focus, is the third-largest independent university in Maryland with more than 4,200 students pursuing bachelor’s, master’s, and adult bachelor’s programs at locations in Stevenson and Owings Mills.

Time

January 22 (Monday) - May 18 (Friday)

Location

Stevenson University

1525 Greenspring Valley Road, Stevenson MD 21153

2feb - 26mayAll DayThe Elements that Define Us

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Event Details

Register for the Exhibition Opening here!

Prince George’s African American Museum and Cultural Center (PGAAMCC) is proud to announce The Elements that Define Us, a Black contemporary portraiture exhibition, presented in conjunction with the University of Maryland David C. Driskell Center’s exhibition: Portraits of Who We Are. The Elements that Define Us exhibition at PGAAMCC will be on display from Feb 2nd-May 26th, 2018.

The Elements that Define Us is a mixed media exhibition, highlighting color, materials, and composition style, that presents a contemporary perspective of the Black American experience. The exhibition will highlight portraits of the DC Metropolitan community and address the stylistic elements used to express the Black American experience locally and beyond. Curator Tomora Wright will focus on the compositional aspects of each piece, which lend symbolic meaning to the subject. Compositional styles and mediums in works of art are intentional and speak to Black American history, culture, communities, rituals, and lifestyles. In this exhibition, we want to give artists a chance to tell us the significance of their chosen artistic medium and how the elements they use play an important role in the stories they tell.

The Elements that Define Us will showcase 21 artists diverse perspective of the Black experience. Wright carefully selected a group of multigenerational artists from the Greater Washington DC Area who excel in various mediums and styles. From mixed media collages to installations, from paintings to drawings and more, this exhibition presents a dynamic and multifaceted selection of work. Exhibition artists include:

Alonzo DavisAkili Ron Anderson

Gina Marie Lewis

Chanel Compton

Taryn Harris

Ulysses Marshall

Preston Sampson

 

Al BurtsJames Terrell

Toni Lane

Jay Durrah

Egbert Evans

Will Watson

Ronal Jackson

 

Tre WilkesElana Casey

Jamea Richmond Edwards

Curtis Woody

Michael Booker

Shawn Lindsay

Zsudayka Nzinga Terrell

 

It is important to include Black artists in the Art History discourse, while also constantly redefining what it means to be a Black American artist in the 21st century. We often reference and draw inspiration from our history and artists who have paved the way, but artwork in 2018 is also undertaking equally challenging themes. PGAAMCC aims to highlight the current cultural climate and encourage continued dialogue. The artwork in The Elements That Define Us challenges viewers to see themselves in the composition of the pieces and recognize their own emotions through the artist’s hand. “Portraits are an intimate lens into the artist’s psyche,” Wright says. “In this exhibition, we will study the artists’ stylistic choices and impulses that ultimately help narrate unique stories, experiences, and emotions.”

Join us on February 2nd for the exhibition opening of The Elements that Define Us. In support of continued community growth in Prince George’s County, we look forward to your participation in supporting the arts and hope to see you there.

Time

February 2 (Friday) - May 26 (Saturday)

Location

Prince George's African American Museum and Cultural Center

4519 Rhode Island Ave, North Brentwood, Maryland 20722

10feb - 25julAll DayRyan Syrell // Elsa Fitzgerald: The Art of LaceOpening Receptions

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Event Details

Image Credit: Ryan Syrell – Desk at Night

The Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower presents two new exhibits: Adventures Close to Home by Ryan Syrell in the First Floor and Mezzanine Galleries, and Elsa Fitzgerald: The Art of Lace by Stacy Stube in the Studio Resident Gallery on the second floor. Both exhibits are on view Saturdays from February 3 through July 25, 2018 from 11am to 4pm. A free opening reception takes place Saturday, February 10 from 4:30 to 6:30pm where guests have the opportunity to view the exhibition, meet the artists and enjoy light refreshments. The Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower is managed by the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts and is located at 21 S. Eutaw Street.

The works in Ryan Syrell’s Adventures Close to Home depict intimate domestic spaces and objects – paintings which grow out of running dialogues and exchanges, relationships, personal histories, and trajectories. They navigate bedrooms, kitchens, tables, desks, and dressers – seeking out, and celebrating a cluttered and cacophonous intimacy. They present keys, cups, plants, computers, paintings, pens, shadows, movements, and absences with equal significance. Syrell paints in a manner that articulates a sense of movement, interconnectivity, and slippage with regard to language and perception. These paintings inhabit the peripheral moment before sensation and language are reconciled in one another. Simultaneously joyful and anxious, manic and celebratory, these spaces can feel overwhelming or claustrophobic, but also by turns calm, ludic, and absurd. The artist employs a form of painting concerned with imbuing vitality into the mundane — seeking out, amplifying, and articulating beautiful moments without ignoring the pervasive anxiety of the time.

It was on Bali, “Island of the Gods,” that designer Stacy Stube was inspired to create the luxury fashion house of Elsa Fitzgerald. Inspired by the island’s traditional Kebaya dress, the exhibition The Art of Lace features nostalgic, detail-oriented fashion dresses created by Stube, a current Bromo Tower resident artist. Many of her pieces feature hand-sewn floral lace motifs that combine 1920’s elegance with Balinese craftsmanship.

Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower is open every Saturday from 11am to 4pm.  Guests have an opportunity to view artwork throughout the building, including 15 floors of working artist studios and special exhibits.  Visitors can also learn more about the historical building and participate in a tour of the clock room ($8).

The Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts is a 501 (c) 3 non-profit organization which serves as Baltimore City’s arts council, events agency and film office. By producing large-scale events such as Light City, Artscape and the Baltimore Book Festival, and providing funding and support to artists, arts programs and organizations across the city, BOPA’s goal is to make Baltimore a more vibrant and creative city.

For more information on exhibits at Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower, contact Melissa Webb, Exhibitions Manager at 443-263-4352.  For more information on the Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower, call 443-874-3596 or visit www.bromoseltzertower.com.

Time

February 10 (Saturday) - July 25 (Wednesday)

Location

Bromo Arts Tower

21 South Eutaw Street, Baltimore MD 21201

1mar - 29aprAll DayBev May

Event Details

​Off Track Art is featuring new Associate Partner Bev Mey in a one woman show. Bev is a local artist who paints landscapes and still lifes in oil. Her show runs from March 1 – April 29 with an opening reception  March10th 4-6:pm coordinating with Second Saturdays in downtown Westminster. Bev has been painting in oils for many years. Her work represents the beauty of nature.

Time

March 1 (Thursday) - April 29 (Sunday)

Location

Off Track Art

11 Liberty Street, Westminster MD 21157

3mar - 10junAll DaySOUL The Stax Musical

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Event Details

SOUL The Stax Musical
Book by Matthew Benjamin
Music and Lyrics by Various Stax Artists
Directed by Kwame Kwei-Armah
Produced in association with Stuart Benjamin and Concord Music

This world premiere musical tells the story of the Memphis-based Stax Records and the launch of iconic artists—including Otis Redding, The Staple Singers, Isaac Hayes, Booker T & The MG’s, Rufus & Carla Thomas, David Porter, Wilson Pickett, Johnny Taylor, and Eddie Floyd—who created the very foundation of American Soul Music.

SOUL The Stax Musical celebrates how music brought Americans together during the early years of the Civil Rights Movement, and continues to bring generations together—from those who remember the early days of R&B, to those who are discovering these phenomenal artists today.

Time

March 3 (Saturday) - June 10 (Sunday)

Location

Center Stage

700 North Calvert Street, Baltimore MD 21202

5mar - 30aprAll DayErnest Kromah - Legacy of an Icon

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Event Details

Ernest Kromah, will open his latest exhibition, The Legacy of an Icon at the Motor House Gallery on March 8, 2018. The Legacy of an Icon is an exhibition that gives the public an opportunity to interact with an exceptional artist’s body of work and his life.

Born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1939, Ernest Kromah has dedicated the majority of his life to nurturing the arts through his paintings, drawings, and prints, and cultivating a foothold in the food industry in Baltimore. The Motor House will present photographs, paintings and mixed-media works of Ernest Kromah providing the public with snapshots of Ernest Kromah’s career and the Kromah Gallery he and his wife, Gail Kromah founded at 1203 Druid Hill Avenue in Baltimore City. This was one of the earliest community arts hubs and gallery. It supported and celebrated the work of many young artists throughout the city of Baltimore.

Alongside his vibrant paintings, The Motor House will also include documentary imagery highlighting Ernest Kromah’s impact on the arts in Baltimore from 1978 to present. The Motor House is very pleased to recognize and support the work of Ernest and Gail Kromah as community arts activists.

Time

March 5 (Monday) - April 30 (Monday)

Location

The Motor House

120 West North Avenue, Baltimore MD 21201

7mar - 10junAll Dayyolk | shell | source | system

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Event Details

March 7 – June 10, 2018

355 Pod

Opening Reception and Artist Talk: Friday, April 6, 7 – 9 PM

 

yolk | shell | source | system is a collaborative installation by Beki Basch and Clay Dunklin. Working intuitively, the artists instate division and order based on the logic of the 355 Pod as it corresponds to the work by mixing high and low craft, disposable and archival, contemporary and ancient. Inspired by the confines of the space itself, Basch and Dunklin channel their own processes and ideas where design meets art meets institutional display.

 

About the artists: 

Bekí Basch is an interdisciplinary artist who works in a project-based practice in which form is dictated by idea. She employs traditional and contemporary practices to investigate universal monomythic traits of cultural, historical and social issues through material. Her work creates suggestively narrative spaces from a wide web of connections. She received a BFA from MICA in 2009 and is on her way to an MFA at UMD, College Park this spring. Bekí has exhibited nationally and internationally in venues such as SÍM Gallery in Reykjavík, Iceland, The Burren College of Art in Ballyvaughan, Ireland, Locust Projects in Miami, FL and Current Space in Baltimore, MD. She recently completed a one-month residency in Reykjavík, Iceland, which she was awarded to research multiple topics including environmental stewardship, national identity and the tourism boom. www.bekibasch.com

 

Clay Dunklin’s video, sculptural, and new media works serve to expand notions around the body and performativity. His work is situated on the thin veil that exists between the body and technology and marks a gooey, fluid, fragile state where various incarnations are reborn out of their former selves. Dunklin has exhibited his work nationally including shows at the Orlando Science Center and the American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center. Originally from East Texas, he received his BFA in drawing at the University of Central Florida in Orlando and is currently an MFA candidate at the University of Maryland, College Park. www.claydunklin.com

Time

March 7 (Wednesday) - June 10 (Sunday)

Location

VisArts

155 Gibbs Street, Rockville MD 20850

9mar - 28aprAll DayZoë Charlton // Lydia Pettit

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Event Details

Image credit: Zoe Charlton- Homebodies Series

The Domestic (Main Gallery)

A solo exhibition of works by Zoë Charlton

 

Black domesticity takes on layered meanings in The Domestic, Zoë Charlton’s first solo exhibition in Baltimore. Charlton presents a series of works on paper inspired by reoccurring imagery in her drawings: suburban houses, African masks, and southern landscapes. Domesticity, or a deep familiarity with and attachment to where one lives, holds different social value depending on the body’s relationship with a place and how one belongs in it. From the privacy of a household to the publicness of national history, the domestic is interior, gendered, comforting, invisible, controlled, and integral to keeping the status quo.

Zoë Charlton creates drawings that explore the ironies of contemporary social and cultural stereotypes. She received her MFA degree from the University of Texas at Austin. Her work has been included in national and international exhibitions including the Harvey B. Gantt Center, Charlotte, NC, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, AR; Studio Museum of Harlem NYC, NY; Contemporary Art Museum, Houston, TX; the Zacheta National Gallery of Art,  Warsaw, Poland and Haas & Fischer Gallery, Zurich, Switzerland. She is a recipient of a Pollock-Krasner grant and Rubys grant. Charlton resides in Baltimore, MD, and is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Art at American University in Washington, DC.

 

BIG SEXY (Members Gallery & Project Space)

An exhibition of paintings by Lydia Pettit

BIG SEXY, an exhibition of paintings by Lydia Pettit, is an exploration of what it means to live after experiencing abuse, and how to come to terms with and respect the body you’re given. After years of unhealthy and traumatic relationships resulting from warped self-image, the artist uses painting to construct worlds that describe the emotional shifts and waves that one goes through in recovery. Pettit’s compositions shift between confrontational and minimized figures, each representing the duality of the strength survivors of abuse are “supposed” to feel, and the fear and doubt they carry with them. Color mirrors emotion, bold brushstrokes emphasize thick flesh, and depictions of tender moments in the bathtub are followed by those representing the melodrama of depression and panic. In BIG SEXY, Pettit seeks to reclaim authority over her image – she’s sharing her own fat, white, unconventional body, and her life inside of it.

Lydia Pettit is an artist and curator from Towson, Maryland. After graduating in 2014 from the Maryland Institute College of Art, she opened Platform Arts Center, a studio building, and Platform Gallery, a contemporary art gallery that focused on showing local and regional artists. She ran the gallery with her partner until 2017, and is currently focusing on her painting practice. Pettit is a two time recipient of the Elizabeth Greensheilds grant for representational art. She currently lives and works in Baltimore, Maryland.

 

For more information on exhibits at School 33 Art Center, call 443-263-4350, visit www.school33.org or follow School 33 on Facebook.

School 33 Art Center is dedicated to providing opportunities for visual and performing artists through solo and group exhibitions, art classes, hands-on workshops, a Studio Artist Program and special events. A program of the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts, School 33 Art Center is supported in part by the Maryland State Arts Council and through private contributions.  School 33 Art Center is the proud recipient of a grant from the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, which supports fearless and innovative collaborations in the spirit of Robert Rauschenberg. The Baltimore Office of Promotion &The Arts is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization which serves as Baltimore City’s arts council, film office, and events agency. By producing large-scale events such as Light City, Artscape and the Baltimore Book Festival, and providing funding and support to artists, arts programs and organizations across the city, BOPA’s goal is to make Baltimore a more vibrant and creative city.

# # #

Time

March 9 (Friday) - April 28 (Saturday)

Location

School 33 Art Center

1427 Light Street, Baltimore MD 21230

15mar - 30aprAll DayAmplify: Work by Matthew Moore and Gideon Bok

Event Details

Gideon Bok and Matthew Moore create works in their studio worlds that speak to the vastness of human experience.

Time

March 15 (Thursday) - April 30 (Monday)

Location

Exeter Gallery

241 South Exeter Street, Baltimore MD 21202

15mar - 24mayAll DayA Beautiful Ghetto Three Years Later: A Conversation About Healing

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The Institute for Integrative Health and the Gordon Parks Foundation announce the upcoming exhibition and program series, A Beautiful Ghetto, Three Years Later: A Conversation About Healing, at the Institute for Integrative Health from March 15 through May 24, 2018. The exhibit will showcase photographs by Devin Allen, a social justice photographer, a fellow of the Gordon Parks Foundation, and Baltimore-native. Allen and the Institute intend to use the exhibition and program series to spark a conversation about healing the individuals and the community of Baltimore.

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

With a rising death count in the years following the Baltimore protests, city residents continue to feel immense pain and frustration at the current state of our city. In bringing his exhibition back to the heart of the city where he grew up, Devin Allen is focused on bringing healing back home.

We always spend so much time on the pain. We measure how strong we are by how much pain we can take,” Allen said. “Can we, for once, focus on how we can address our issues, get educated, and start the healing process? I want this show to be a platform to address our pain freely and heal together.

This exhibition, which coincides with the third anniversary of the protests sparked by the death of Freddie Gray, is a part of a broader Institute initiative focused on the use of art and nature as tools for helping people recover from trauma. “Engagement in the arts has been proven to reduce stress, boost self-esteem, and aid the healing process,” said Brian Berman, MD, founder and president of the Institute for Integrative Health. “We welcome this opportunity to work with Devin on holding a sacred space for people to come together, through creative expression and open dialogue, to explore how we can heal ourselves and our city.”

The conversation of healing will take place over 10-weeks and will include an interactive exhibit that will allow visitors to express their thoughts on healing themselves and the city.

THE PROGRAMMING SCHEDULE

With a firm belief that art can heal individuals and communities, the Institute is proud to partner with the Gordon Parks Foundation to bring Allen’s work home to Baltimore. During the engagement, the Institute will be offering different programs that promote health and healing.

 

March 15th
6:00 – 8:30 PM
Exhibition Opening and Artist’s Reception

Join the Institute as we welcome Devin Allen and A Beautiful Ghetto. Lite refreshments will be served.
For more information or to reserve your spot, please visit our Eventbrite Invitation.

April 12th
TBD
Community Organizing

A cross-discipline panel discussion exploring the mobilization of community in an attempt to heal the community.

April 13th
TBD
Community Healers

Dialogue with artists, writers, and community leaders who are creating healing spaces for their communities.

April 14th
TBD
Action and Healing

Interactive activities throughout the day to promote and encourage healing through engagement with and production of art.
May 24th
6:00 – 8:30 PM
Closing Celebration

Final celebratory reception of exhibition and program series. The Institute will also reveal the living art installation and unveil a new community initiative.

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

Gallery hours will be held on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays from 11 AM to 3 PM during the engagement. Admission is free to the public.

 

For more information on attending the opening reception or one of our other events, click here or email us at events [at] tiih.org.

Time

March 15 (Thursday) - May 24 (Thursday)

Location

The Institute for Integrative Health

1407 Fleet Street, Baltimore 21231

21mar - 9mayAll DayJoyce J. Scott // Kyle Hackett

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“I’d like my art to induce people to stop raping, torturing, and shooting each other.

I don’t have the ability to end violence, racism, and sexism. But my art can help them

look and think.” —Joyce J. Scott

 

Goya Contemporary Gallery is pleased to present a new exhibition of works by gallery artist and MacArthur ‘Genius’ Awardee Joyce J. Scott (Born 1948, Baltimore).  Corresponding to her critically acclaimed exhibition Harriet Tubman and Other Truths [which was co-produced by Grounds For Sculpture and Goya Contemporary, with guest curators Patterson Sims and Lowery Sims], this latest exhibition [curated by Amy Eva Raehse] further develops narrative around social and political injustices, sexism, racism, violence, systems of power, and biases within the artist’s personal history, and our collective experience.

 

Born to sharecroppers in North Carolina who were descendants of slaves, Scott’s family migrated to Baltimore where Joyce was born and raised.  The artist hales from a long line of makers with extraordinary craftsmanship adept at pottery, knitting, metalwork, basketry, storytelling, and quilting.  Scott made art “in vitro” according to the artist.  In reality, the close relationship with her mother, celebrated fiber artist Elizabeth Talford Scott, fostered a creative environment where Scott began to quilt and sew as early as her third year of age. At age five, Scott made her first necklace, a practice for which she is now renowned.  Eventually, her creative exploration grew to include the use of beads, and her technique evolved with time and further instruction from a Native American beader who exposed Scott to the free form, off-loom peyote stitch method for which Scott further innovated and is now best known.

 

Scott’s wide-ranging body of work has crossed styles and mediums, from the most intricate beaded form to large scale outdoor installation.  Her recent projects include her 2017 Graffiti Harriet, an earthen work made of mixed media– including beads, compressed soil, clay, and straw—on site at Grounds For Sculpture and intended to disintegrate over time “like Harriet’s memory did,” returning to the earth but leaving behind a pile of objects that once adorned her 15-foot sculpted figure.  Other projects include glassworks made on the Italian island of Murano, which Goya Contemporary arranged for the artist so she may realize works for the 2013 Venice Biennale exhibition Glasstress.

 

Many of the newly created works in Joyce J. Scott: Still Happening in 2018, integrate her celebrated beadwork with blown glass sculpture created with artisans in Murano, as well as with Tim McFadden Glass Studio in the artist’s home town of Baltimore.   Scott repositions craft as a forceful stage for social commentary which stays with the viewer, if not cultivates activism.

 

“Indeed, you can’t make out what these sculptures are about without coming closer

than you feel you should — and seeing things you won’t soon forget”

– Nancy Princenthal, New York Times, 2018

 

This new work conflates gun violence against predominately black men in the United States, with exploitation of children and women, probing crisis’s that plague modern society.    In a series of 14 beaded bullets, Scott combines the beauty of the bead with the brutality of the bullet, beading onto them the initials of victims of inhumane ferocity such as Trayvon Martin, Tamir Rice, Rodney King, and Freddie Gray- the later whose cruel treatment and the resulting civic uprising transpired blocks from the artist’s home and studio.

 

In Harriet’s Rifle 2, the artist links her reverence for nature to her bewilderment of human nature.  Glass blown flowers, petals, berries, grasshoppers, bees, bugs and praying mantis comingle atop a daintily blown, striated glass gun.   This is not the first time Scott has discussed gun violence.  Her exhibition “Can’t We all Just Get Along” [Goya Contemporary, 2014. Curated by this same curator] focused very specifically on gun violence following gun massacres in school, sadly, a state of trauma we have failed to improve four years later.  Scott cannot help but absorb the culture around her, however, in her hands horrors are made so strikingly alluring that one is drawn to them, only to be left in shock.

 

Sex Traffic Two includes a beaded skeleton which appears to be raping the glass blown gun fashioned in the shape of a woman below him.  The duo drags yet another beaded woman into the fold, legs spread and arms flailing as she resists being towed and raped.    “Each bead strings together a potent message we cannot, and should not ignore.  She is making a statement that our survival and our downfall are tied to everyone’s survival and downfall.  We are linked like the beads in her work, and we can choose to be an armature for support, or we can opt to drag each other down” says Raehse.

 

Joyce J. Scott: Still Happening in 2018 delivers a compelling missive about the state of our civilization, today.  Still in 2018, we mourn the same failures from our past, but Scott is hopeful that we can stand up and make a change.

 

Joyce J. Scott received a B.F.A. (1970) from the Maryland Institute College of Art, an M.F.A. (1971) from the Instituto Allende in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. Her work has appeared in solo and group exhibitions at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Museum of Art and Design, Grounds For Sculpture, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Fuller Craft Museum, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Prospect.2, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, among others.

 

Her work is held in the private and public collections of numerous national and international museums including: Baltimore Museum of Art, MD; Brooklyn Museum of Art, NY;  National Museum of African American History and Culture, Washington, DC;  Detroit Institute of the Arts, MI; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, CA; Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY;  Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA; Museum of Art and Design, NY; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX; The Smithsonian, Washington, DC; Philadelphia Museum of Art, PA;  Reginald F. Lewis Museum, Baltimore, MD;  Speed Museum, Louisville, KY; Yale University, New Haven, CT;  among others.

 

Additionally, Scott has been the recipient of myriad commissions, grants, awards, residencies, and prestigious honors from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation, Anonymous Was a Woman, American Craft Council, National Living Treasure Award, Lifetime Achievement Award from the Women’s Caucus for the Arts, Mary Sawyers Imboden Baker Award, and MacArthur Fellowship, among others.

 

For more information, please contact Amy Raehse

Time

March 21 (Wednesday) - May 9 (Wednesday)

Location

Goya Contemporary

3000 Chestnut Avenue, Mill Centre #214, Baltimore MD 21211

22mar - 5mayAll DayThat's Why I'm Here

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Event Details

photo: Image from “Happy Accidents” by Kim Llerena,Mesa Verde National Park, CO (Cruise America), 2017

“That’s Why I’m Here”

Kyle Bauer, Cynthia Connolly, Elizabeth Huey,

Kim Llerena, and Jordan Rathus

Curated by Meaghan Kent

Exhibition Dates: March 22 – May 5, 2018

Opening Reception: March 22, 5-7pm

The newly dedicated Cody Gallery at Marymount University is pleased to present “That’s Why I’m Here” with Kyle Bauer, Cynthia Connolly, Elizabeth Huey, Kim Llerena, and Jordan Rathus.  The exhibition considers location and landscape as an impetus in creating work and questions our sense of placement within the grander scheme of space. Bittersweet, melancholic moments run throughout the exhibition as one discovers that within these moments of reorientation we can find perspective, humility and humor.

 

The title is derived from the video work of Jordan Rathus (Bronx, NY) in which the artist travels to artist residencies in Stavanger, Norway; Reykjavik, Iceland; and Catskill, NY. Shifting between various locations, the artist experiences different lifestyles and professions from the past in a quest for an alternative life. The video reads like a farcical travelogue as it reveals discovery and loss through cultural identification and experimentation.

 

Like the piece by Rathus, other works in the exhibition are marked by experiences made from the environment, both real and imaginary. Kim Llerena’s (Washington DC) new series of “Happy Accidents” are photographic takes of created landscapes set before a sublime space in a chance happening. “Knee High by the 4th of July” by Kyle Bauer (Baltimore, MD) is reflective of the extensive car trips starting from his youth where he would “slip into a subconscious state watching the rows in the field “chatter” like frames of a movie.” The Minimilist white sculpture is installed so the husk forms are both at eye level and the level to which corn is at its peak. Elizabeth Huey’s (Los Angeles, CA) richly colored paintings are psychologically charged social and active settings. Each tableaux explores the division between interior and exterior consciousness as her figures are often immersed in scenes of rehabilitation and recreation. Lastly, Cynthia Connolly’s (Arlington, VA) handmade mixed media letterpressed book made in the late 90s folds out into a series of images taken of trucks moving from East to West. Using a film camera from the drivers’ seat, Connolly photographed the trucks going in the opposite direction. Starting in the West, you see the wide-open spaces and trucks from a distance, as she drives East, the trucks move in closer as the highways become more condensed.

 

The exhibition is curated by Meaghan Kent.

 

Cody Gallery of Marymount University is located at 1000 North Glebe Road, 2nd Floor. The gallery hours are ThursdaySaturday, 1-6pm and by appointment. Street parking and Capital Bikeshare are available. The gallery is located near Metroline Orange: Ballston-MU.

Time

March 22 (Thursday) - May 5 (Saturday)

Location

Cody Gallery at Marymount University

1000 N Glebe Rd, Arlington, VA 22203

23mar - 29aprAll DayMinas Konsolas | AURORA

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Event Details

HAMILTON GALLERY 
presents
Minas Konsolas | AURORA
In conjunction with Light City 2018
March 23 – April 29, 2018
 
Opening Reception
Friday, April 6, 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Artist’s Reception
Sunday, April 15, 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Gallery Hours: Friday 4 – 8, Saturday 12 – 8,  Sunday 11 – 3
Contact:
Bridget Z. Sullivan, Gallerist
Minas Konsolas

Time

March 23 (Friday) - April 29 (Sunday)

Location

Hamilton Gallery

5502 Harford Road, Baltimore MD 21214

24mar - 27aprAll DayA Suspended State in Last, a solo project by Sessa Englund

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Event Details

SESSA ENGLUND

A Suspended State in Last

Opening Reception: Saturday, March 24 7pm-10pm

March 24, 2018 through April 27, 2018

Guest Spot @ THE REINSTITUTE is proud to present A Suspended State in Last, a solo project by Sessa Englund.

A Suspended State in Last examines the adjournment of art as historical matter. Englund explores ideas surrounding art rituals as a potential parallel oeuvre, subsequently complicating how art relates to the shared material experience. Englund’s critique falls on materialism as artistic production; they investigate the relationships between matter and bodies, from the hierarchies of gender to the abject and phobic. The work explores the vitality of substances and addresses how the concepts of inter-materiality and trans-materiality emerge in the hybrid zones of socio-political experimentation.

Much of material history has been reserved for the sake of capital value, such that we have forgotten the importance of art as a shared cultural value. The increasing importance of humanitarian issues, fueled by wealth disparity and the current climate crisis, has challenged our cultural Institutions into doing more than simply represent the change that art embodies.

It should be the role of our cultural institutions to be willing actors and agents for expanded notions of time, space, process, and participation; not to rely on the antiquities of the past to reinforce the vitality of institutional connoisseurship. The allure of material history as memory causes an inability to anticipate socio-political ills, thus impeding the trajectory towards fulfillment of a greater purpose.

Sessa Englund is an artist and curator working across sculptural and time-based mediums, based in NYC and Gothenburg, Sweden. They received their BFA at the School of Art+Design, S.U.N.Y. Purchase, and is a member and founder of Disclaimer Gallery and Cura (Projects).

Notes from the artist:

Much of my work surrounds the idea of shared memory, through advances of “craft” and “cultural objects.” I believe this to be increasingly true in what is happening in my studio right now. The objects that draw my attention all seem to have a connecting thread back into my own past experiences, but engorged, cannibalized versions of themselves. Repeating elements emerge: piercings, “trolls” (These troll faces are made with speed, the less intrusion into the form the better), dead materials such as dried sunflowers (the happiest of flowers if you ask me), I think there is a sense of not nostalgia, but whatever the opposite of nostalgia is (p.s. I looked this up and there dos not seem to be a word for the opposite of nostalgia, which is very interesting). Using autobiographical experiences, I associate and activate the innate socio-political framework for a material. These are bastardized, swollen versions of familiar objects, made unfamiliar, I speak against the failure of effort and finally the humanization process in the fall from grace, the objects all seem to be cut short from their potential.

The use of denim is purposeful in my piece: denim has historically been a textile whose tough and resilient characteristics lent itself to hard labor and manual work. In our socio-historical context, it has come to be seen as a “working man’s” textile, working man’s clothes. It has also through this lens been made to represent manliness, desired masculinity, sexuality. This conscious coupling of material and the labor it represents, joined with the subtle process of craft, long associated with women and the private environments that such craft adorned, highlights the clever subversiveness that typifies much of my work. By insinuating an association between the unsung labor of men and women, through a craft historically dismissed as feminine and therefore not fine art, the piece forces us, the viewer, to question the relationship between contemporary fine art and its function as adornment, and the labor that creates it. There is something fragile and a little uncomfortable in this inquiry. My work is the product of my own hand; my process essential to its form as a work, but much of what is produced for an art market, in today’s contemporary art world, is produced by anonymous laborers, for patrons who delight in the product and its associations, but not necessarily the hands that bore it into being.

By bringing this into a suspended state in the wooden frames, I am both adding a sense of entrapment and offering. The piece takes on the quality of a hide, removed from a body and stretched out to dry. The suspension aspect of these sculptures alludes to a sense of “presenting”: here is this object suspended in air, framed within a cube, the audience has full freedom to move around and find their own entrance into the piece, allowing for much more bodily engagement with the objects.

The “log” is the main trunk of a commercially grown fern. It is a Christmas tree, really just a large house plant, there’s something sad about it. But by removing all of its branches, it suddenly seems to have some agency that it didn’t embody earlier: it is almost unrecognizable, it has started to take on a wild and feral look. The main give away is its smell: it spells like pine, but even that isn’t really indicative of its actual mundanity. I find that sympathetic, its masquerading as “authentic” or “wild”, I start to sympathize with it, it becomes a prolonged object much in the way that Michel Serres’ theory of Quasi-Objects functions: the object itself is a stand-in for said object, and a stand in for the viewer, suspended. If the version of this sculpture in Spain was about the geographic location and history of the residency, then this version done here in NYC is about myself and the artificiality of this city and myself within this city.

-Sessa Englund

Time

March 24 (Saturday) - April 27 (Friday)

Location

Guest Spot @ The Reinstitute

1715 North Calvert Street, Baltimore MD 21202

25mar - 29julAll DaySacred Spring: Vienna Secession Posters from the Collection of LeRoy E. Hoffberger and Paula Gately Tillman Hoffberger

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Sacred Spring highlights the Viennese Secession, an influential group of artists who sought to break free from the academic art of the past. Founded in 1898, the group shared their ideas through public exhibitions and images and texts for journals, including Ver Sacrum or Sacred Spring. Two calendar pages made by Gustav Klimt and Kolomon Moser for the 1901 issue of Ver Sacrum are featured as well as three posters by Klimt, Moser, and Egon Schiele that advertise the Viennese Secession’s exhibitions in 1898, 1899, and 1918 respectively.

One of the images most frequently associated with the Art Nouveau style—Peter Behren’s influential 1898 color woodcut The Kiss—is among the beguiling works on view, as is Jan Toorop’s striking 1894 color lithograph poster advertising Delft Salad Oil. Toorop’s design was so influential that the Art Nouveau movement in the Netherlands is often referred to as the Slaolie (Salad Oil) style.

The Hoffberger bequest is a major and important addition to the Museum’s collection of late 19th-century and modern works on paper. Austrian, Dutch, and German posters expand upon and add a new dimension to the Museum’s holdings of French and American posters, including deep pockets of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and Jules Chéret.

This exhibition is curated by Rena Hoisington, Senior Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs.

Time

March 25 (Sunday) - July 29 (Sunday)

Location

Baltimore Museum of Art

10 Art Museum Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218-3898

3apr - 27All Day29th National Drawing & Print Competitive Exhibition

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Event Details

Gormley Gallery presents

29th National Drawing & Print Competitive Exhibition

 

Artist’s Reception and Gallery Talk

Saturday, April 7, 2018 from 4 to 6 pm

 

Location:

Gormley Gallery
Notre Dame of Maryland University
4701 N Charles St.
Fourier Hall, 2nd floor
Baltimore, MD 21210

Exhibition Dates: April 3 through April 27, 2018

 

Admission: Free

Website: ndm.edu/gormleygallery

 

The exhibition features works on paper by 28 artists from the local, regional and national art community, selected from more than 500 entries. Kim Domanski, Public Art Coordinator, Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts is the juror.

 

Time

april 3 (Tuesday) - 27 (Friday)

Location

Gormley Gallery @ Notre Dame University of Maryland

4701 North Charles Street, Baltimore MD 21210

3apr - 25All Day2018 IMDA MFA Thesis Exhibit: Lucky Suns

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The Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture presents the annual MFA Thesis Exhibition, featuring works by the seven graduate students will who receive MFAs in Intermedia and Digital Arts in 2018. The work selected represents the culmination of each student’s unique experience in UMBC’s dynamic and demanding MFA program.

Parastoo Aslanbeik’s installation is an exploration of immigrants’ lives and the influence of the recent “Travel Ban” or “Muslim Ban” on a certain group of people due to their ethnicity and race. She investigates the idea of diversity and equality in her research and thesis by combining an old photographic technique (wet plate collodion) with sound, light, and sculpture. Simple materials such as tree branches and cardboard boxes are brought together in her monumental sculptures to create metaphors for equality.

Mollye Bendell makes digital and analog sculptures to connect with digital and analog worlds. Her work uses the intangible nature of electronic media as a metaphor for exploring vulnerability, visibility, and longing in a world that can feel isolating. Her immersive installation Wander/Wonder explores the nature of speculation and our changing relationship with physicality. The exhibition consists of two separate but connected experiences: the Wander, a walkable street map of Baltimore City with all buildings removed except for psychic reader storefronts and the Wonder, a zero-gravity digital astral plane experienced as a virtual reality environment. While a participant flies through the Wonder side, the Wander side is projected on a screen for spectators. A single crystal ball controller navigates both environments – one person guides the experiences of spectators in Wander while immersed in the VR environment of Wonder.

Jeffrey L. Gangwisch’s work explores the interaction of digital and physical media with a focus on the human figure.  His contribution to Lucky Suns explores three-dimensional figure scans incorporated into laser-etched photographs, illuminated 3D printed sculpture, and augmented-reality installation.

Christopher Kojzar creates art in response to interactions he has with other people when he enters active public spaces and openly engages in practices such as drawing and live action video. Sketching in public has prompted interactions with security personnel, police officers, TSA agents, and pedestrians, and he explores the increasingly troubled phenomenon of observing and being observed in an era of escalating surveillance and mistrust—complicating it further by signaling his identity as an artist. The gallery showcases his drawings, immersive video and sculptural installation, shaping a nuanced body of work about the oppositional gaze and the implied hierarchies of observation.

MJ Neuberger’s thesis work, Mending Nona’s Piña, takes its title from her attempt to mend an heirloom cloth made by native Filipino weavers with strands of her hair, suggesting how forces of colonialism enabled intergenerational trauma and abuse in her family. Weaving her hair into natural materials and settings, Neuberger posits a return to an indigenous body/self that is Othered in abuse and colonization, and, combining her tears with water blessed in a native healing ritual, she suggests the transformative power of grief.

Mitchell Noah’s thesis represents an alternative vision of public service within public space—reimagining the participants, practices, tools, and iconographies through humor, craft, and design. Through playful reconfiguration, otherwise mundane maintenance activities become touchstones for serious issues: utopias, justice, social cohesion, mobility, infrastructure, and labor. By finding ways of working around failing structures and intervening with ad-hoc methods at a city-block scale, his works of sculpture, video, drawing, and found objects reclaim public space.

Idil Yakut evaluates various aspects of communication, questioning how translation can or cannot serve as a path to understanding the complex roles of language in expressing embodied experience. Mining language’s capacity in sound, text, and image, the videos in her installation challenge clarity of speech, showing its fundamental state of flux, and her texts test the power of translation, exposing its limits while also inviting embodied interaction.

Admission is free.

Time

april 3 (Tuesday) - 25 (Wednesday)

Location

UMBC - The Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture

4apr - 19augAll DayMary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley: We Are Ghosts

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In collaboration with the Johns Hopkins University’s Center for Advanced Media Studies, the BMA presents an exhibition of works by MacArthur Award-winner Mary Reid Kelley and her collaborator and husband Patrick Kelley. The exhibition includes two films featuring their signature black-and-white sets and costumes. This is Offal (2016) is inspired by Thomas Hood’s 1844 poem, The Bridge of Sighs, in which the narrator, a forensic pathologist, laments the suicide of a young woman whose body is pulled from the Thames. The Kelleys’ new film, In the Body of the Sturgeon, brings a feminist perspective to an exploration of life on a submarine stationed in the Pacific at the end of World War II, with the USS Torsk docked in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor inspiring the mise-en-scène. The exhibition also includes six light boxes featuring characters from both films and elements from the Kelleys’ sculptural sets.

This exhibition is curated by Senior Curator of Contemporary Art Kristen Hileman in collaboration with the JHU Center for Advanced Media Studies.

Time

April 4 (Wednesday) - August 19 (Sunday)

Location

Baltimore Museum of Art

10 Art Museum Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218-3898

4apr - 30junAll DayATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS: 30th ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION

Event Details

ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS: 30th ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION featuring Robert Andriulli, Anne Marie Fleming, Ellen Hill, Sheep Jones, Kathryn O’Grady, Katja Oxman, Hollis Sigler and Frank Trefny

Time

April 4 (Wednesday) - June 30 (Saturday)

Location

Steven Scott Gallery

808 South Anne Street, Baltimore Maryland 21231

6apr - 13mayAll DayInteract, Integrate

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Jackie Hoysted, Pick and Mix, detail view of installation

April 6 – May 13, 2018

Heloisa Escudero, Michelle Herman, Jackie Hoysted, and Denise Philipbar

Kaplan Gallery

Opening Reception and Artist Talk: Friday, April 6, 7 – 9 PM

 

Interact: to act together : to come together and have an effect on each other

Integrate: to combine (two or more things) to form or create something

 

INTERACT + INTEGRATE is an exhibition that presents the work of four artists whose art practices are concerned with the interaction and/or integration of the audience in their work. Interaction is usually concerned with communication. It can simply be a manual interaction between people and things or for new media artists typically involves the interaction between humans, computers, sensors and networks. Conversely, integration is concerned about combining, assimilating, bringing together and the coalescing of people and things.

Heloisa Escudero looks for interaction, reaction, participation and/or inclusiveness of the audience in most of her artwork. For her, the integration of the audience is essential and creates opportunities for the viewer to become an interactive/tactile part of the art itself. For Escudero, there are too many opportunities for exclusion in life and she sees them is as a form of rejection. As a result, the basis of her art practices is to include/interact with the audience in a more personal level. Any aspect of her artwork, from the elements of construction, to concept and interaction is designed not to reject anyone at any circumstance because there is enough of that in life.   www.heloisaescudero.com

Michelle Herman’s new media and interactive works are often inspired by moments of communication that occur on the smallest of scales. Some examples include quorum sensing (the way in which bacteria are thought to communicate) and “contagious” gestures such as yawning and smiling (which are thought to activate mirror neurons in the brain). She is interested in how these processes seem to highlight our intrinsic need to connect with one other as well as how modern culture and technology has mediated these experiences. Like the ideas they explore, these works are interactive so the viewer can truly experience the work in a multi-sensory way. Herman wants them to feel the piece in a more active sense than just presenting them with an image.   www.michellelisaherman.com

Jackie Hoysted’s main concern is to no longer relegate the art audience to viewer but to integrate them in the art making process where they become collaborator and co-creator. Her idea is that the audience becomes engaged in the creation of the artwork and determines the aesthetic “look” of the artwork based for example on color selections and placement. As a result, the artwork can never be completed as the audience can choose to rearrange the artwork at any time. The artwork is therefore never fixed and mutable.   www.jackiehoysted.com

Denise Philipbar ’s installations follow two modes of enquiry. Some installations are musings on our interactions with the technology we create hence forming the basis for their interactive nature, while other installations are social practice projects in nature and evolve from the premise that social practice projects grow out of thoughts that are inspired by the way we interact directly with each other, rather than technology. For Philipbar’s musings on technology, she mostly uses found objects such as test tubes or surveillance cameras that are assembled and modified into site specific, large-scale works. In contrast, her social practice projects are typically constructed with objects that she either handcrafts or has manufactured/altered to her specifications.   www.denisephilipbar.com

Time

April 6 (Friday) - May 13 (Sunday)

Location

VisArts

155 Gibbs Street, Rockville MD 20850

6apr - 29All DayVisability Art Lab

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Max DeMulder, Creatures of the Stormy Sea, 2017, Acrylics on canvas, mixed media, 16 x 20 inches

April 6 – April 29, 2018

Concourse Gallery

Opening Reception and Artist Talk: Friday, April 6, 7 – 9 PM

 

Group exhibition featuring artists from the VisAbility Art Lab at VisArts.

About the VisAbility Art Lab: VisAbility Art Lab is a supported art studio for emerging adult artists with disabilities who have a strong interest in making art part of their professional careers.  VisAbility Art Lab was founded as a partnership between VisArts and Madison House Autism Foundation with the goal to provide artists with a supported studio where they can explore and develop their artistic talents, participate in workforce development and life skills training, and forge a deeper and more meaningful relationship with the fully inclusive creative community.

Participants create art at their own pace, observe and learn art techniques from studio artists, work with a curator on developing exhibitions, and interact with members of the public who are attending art classes, camps, gallery tours and artist talks. Basic life skills and workforce development training are designed to promote self-sufficiency, success in the workforce, and growth as an artist and individual.

Within the studio, artists create both 2D and 3D work, including ceramics, digital art, painting, drawing, and sculpture. Artists join in the studio for part or full days with individualized schedules. Artists receive a 60% commission on sales of artwork and design and licensing fees from merchandise.

The VisAbility Art Lab has grown and expanded since its inception which began as a pilot program in September 2015 with one artist. In January 2017 it had grown to 5 artists and is starting 2018 with 12 artists. Many of the artists who attend the VisAbility Art Lab have increased their hours of attendance and the community of artists within the studio has many strong bonds.

The Art of Inclusion was the first exhibit for the VisAbility Art Lab and featured artists from the program as well as other studios in the metro area. VisAbility Art Lab has since had a successful solo art show at VisArts, participated in Outer Limits at the Ratner Gallery, Artomatic DC, Grump Art Festival, Takoma Park Folk Festival, VisArts 30th Anniversary Celebration and hosted their own Holiday Art Show. Many of the artists in the program have had success in selling their art work. These events each have attracted a broad audience of family, friends, artists, collectors and the Rockville Town Square public.

For more information about the program or to purchase artwork, please contact Elaine Parks at [email protected]{{{{homeurl_non_www}}}}

Time

april 6 (Friday) - 29 (Sunday)

Location

VisArts

155 Gibbs Street, Rockville MD 20850

7apr - 16junAll DayDiana Guererro-Macia + a collaboration: Alex Ebstein & Sarah Eargle

Event Details

Time

April 7 (Saturday) - June 16 (Saturday)

Location

'sindikit

405 East Oliver Street 2nd Floor, Baltimore MD 21202

7apr - 29All DaySocial Ingredients

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Social Ingredients: Performance
Showroom Café and Bar (120 W North Ave)
March 23rd, 2018, 7-9pm
Featuring: Christine Ferrera ‘’Starbux Diary’’, Christine Stiver ‘’Too Damn Sincere’’ in collaboration with actor Tracie Jiggetts
A pair of performance will be presented on March 23, 7pm at Showroom Café and Bar, located on the first floor of Motor House in Baltimore as part of ‘’Social Ingredients’’ project. Artist Christine Ferrera will perform her work ‘’Starbux Diary’’, a time-based art project where the artist spent a decade writing comment cards to Starbucks. In performance, Ferrera will read a selection of her letters to Starbucks and performers will read the responses she received via video. ‘’Too Damn Sincere’’ is artist Christine Stiver’s new work in collaboration with actor Tracie Jiggetts. This performance, which utilizes the sensations of teeth scraping silverware and silverware scraping porcelain to undermine the sincerity of manners, will also be performed.
About the Artists:
Christine Ferrera is a Baltimore-based performance artist and comedian. She began her artistic career as a visual artist. However, after completing several series of paintings and artist books, she discovered a narrative thread running through her work and made the leap to time-based media. Inspired by the multi-media performance of Laurie Anderson and the experimental humor of Andy Kaufman, her current practice lives at the dangerous intersection of art and comedy. Ultimately, she strives to make work that blurs the line between the two, if such a line exists. In performance, Ferrera shares the surprising and vulnerable aspects of herself in order to connect with audiences through storytelling.
Christine Stiver’s interdisciplinary work has its beginnings in 2012 when she joined the Baltimore-based dance company Effervescent Collective. She is a founding member of Triptych: Movement Image Sound, which produces interdisciplinary, site-specific, and collaborative performance in the area. In the spring of 2015 she choreographed and produced her first full-length work, Dank, presented at the Ynot Lot in Baltimore. Her video, sculpture and performance work has been exhibited at the Communiverse in Washington D.C.,; D:Center, EMP Collective, Baltimore Clayworks, the YNot Lot, Terrault Contemporary and St. Charles Projects in Baltimore; and Present Company and the Midtown Hilton in NY. Stiver’s 2017 performative installation, Tender Picking, was presented at Sideshow Gallery in Brooklyn, with documentation from that project recently exhibited at Ohio University in “Temporal and Corporeal: A Broad Scope of Performance Art.” She is a graduate of the School of Visual Arts MFA program in Art Practice, class of 2017.
Tracie Marie Jiggetts, born and raised in Baltimore, is a captivating dancer, actor, choreographer and director who believes in the power of individualism and creativity. Jiggetts began her training at the Baltimore School for the Arts and continued at Catonsville Community College, Studio 801, Morton Street Dance Studio and Towson State. She holds a BA in Urban Arts from Coppin State University. Jiggetts had performed at countless venues such as The Lyric, Arena Players, Center Stage and The National Black Theatre Festival. She is the founder of The ART of TRUTH and director for the Maryland Summer Center Arts program. Most recently Jiggetts directed “Skittles and Sweet Tea" and “Once on this Island” for Connexions and “The Wiz" for Spotlighters Theatre.
Social Ingredients is Rebecca Lu’s MICA MFA Curatorial Practice Thesis project, which aims to immerse audiences in food culture through installation, sculpture, video, performance, and public programs. The project’s curatorial platform explores the significance of meal production and consumption as both a social component of everyday life and a meaningful art practice.
The exhibition will be on view at Current Space (421 N Howard) from April 7 – 29, 2018 with an opening reception on April 7, 7-10pm.

Time

april 7 (Saturday) - 29 (Sunday)

Location

Current Space

421 North Howard Street, Baltimore MD 21201

7apr - 27mayAll DayWe Interrupt This Program

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“We Interrupt this Program…”

An art show about disrupting the straight male gaze in sci-fi/fantasy art, including visual art, film and video games. The exhibition features two dozen local, national, and international artists. The work is a mix of traditional and digital media, exploring the depth of possibilities when gender roles are subverted, when powerful women are represented, and when our expectations of characters are interrupted.

In Laura Mulvey’s 1975 essay Visual and Other Pleasures, the concept of the male gaze in cinema is outlined as a visual narrative controlled by an active male character and a passive female character. Simply put, the story is told, and viewed by the audience, through the eyes of a heterosexual male. Consequently, the story depicts the female character in “their traditional exhibitionist role” and are “looked at and displayed”.

Despite depicting imaginary worlds where anything is possible, all too often sci-fi and fantasy artistic mediums fall victim to the male gaze, objectifying women, underutilizing depth of character development, or failing to cast women as well as others in the LGBTQA community in central roles. We Interrupt this Program.. Is an art show aimed to disrupt the male gaze in sci-fi and fantasy mediums. The show will open to the public on April 7, 2018, and be on view until May 27, 2018.

Time

April 7 (Saturday) - May 27 (Sunday)

Location

Tectonic Space

2000 Greenmount Ave, Baltimore MD 21218

7apr - 27mayAll DayMike McConnell: Étude in See

Event Details

April 7-May 27, 2018

Public Reception: Sunday, April 8, 2-4 pm

After graduating from Maryland Institute College of Art in 1975, Mike McConnell worked for over 30 years as an illustrator. His paintings, drawings, and constructions are fueled by life experiences and nature. His show, Étude in See, makes extensive use of an early childhood technique of drawing with crayons and ink on paper. He is currently a resident studio artist at the Motor House in the Station North Arts District of Baltimore.

Time

April 7 (Saturday) - May 27 (Sunday)

Location

Montpelier Arts Center

9652 Muirkirk Rd, Laurel, MD

7apr - 4mayAll DayReflections of Baltimore: We, Too, Are MICA

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Reflections of Baltimore: We, Too, Are MICA

Six MICA Students Create Imagery on Life and Love in Baltimore.

Our living, breathing contemporary art space that allows new Baltimore based artists to bring their trending and cutting edge work to the masses in our galleries. Every month we will display NEW work from names you NEED to know. Visit us often to see the artists design their exhibitions, hang their work and celebrate being part of the collection. Follow their progress and process via Lewis social media at @lewismuseum on Instagram and Twitter.

This is an interactive and innovative component to our Reflections gallery on our 2nd Floor. We reflect the community … We reflect you … Reflections of Baltimore.

Featured:

Tyler Ballon
Mark Fleuridor
Drew Gray
Moses Jeune
Destiny Belgrave
Monica Ikegwu

Time

April 7 (Saturday) - May 4 (Friday)

Location

Reginald F. Lewis Museum

830 East Pratt Street, Baltimore MD 21202

7apr - 28All DayBarbara Wolfe

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One of the distinguishing characteristics of Barbara’s work has always been the use of the brushstroke. She developed her painterly sensibility during her studies at the Maryland Institute of Art where she was influenced by the work of Lucien Freud and John Singer Sargent. Although the matter of her paintings has changed throughout the years from figure narrative to landscape and ultimately florals they are connected through an appreciation for the movement and texture that can be created on the canvas with oils. Her love for travel has cultivated a deep interest in Natures beauty and ultimately led her to a career in Floral Design. It is from this that she draws inspiration for her new body of work.

 

Barbara would say she started at a much younger stage, but it wasn’t until Barbara returned from a backpacking trip at the age of 28 that she realized how lovely it was to be deeply connected to a piece of land. When she returned her mother gave her a 4×8 plot of dirt in a raised bed and she went crazy. It took a little guidance to reign her in but it was there that Barbara discovered an amazing pleasure in the patience and hard work of helping something grow. It’s a much slower pace, especially in contrast with our crazy hectic world where we don’t get much time to stop and smell the flowers and she suppose this is what leads her into her new body of work. Barbara wants the viewer to be drawn in and awed by the complexity of a bloom, or feel the living breathing energy in the leaves and stems, and maybe leave with a bit of wonder in how its all done and an appreciation for the hard work of nature which we so often tend to forget or pass by.

The Alchemy of Art is a local contemporary gallery focusing on but not limited to local up and coming artist. The building itself is a unique space as it is a converted convent and the gallery is on the entry level and one of the two rooms is the old chapel room with beautiful arched ceilings.   The gallery hours are Thursday through Saturday 12:30pm to 6:30pm and 1pm to 6pm on Sunday. To keep posted on events follow us on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/AlchemyOfArt and keep an eye on our website http://www.thealchemyofart.net/

Time

april 7 (Saturday) - 28 (Saturday)

Location

The Alchemy of Art

1637 Eastern Ave, Baltimore MD 21231

11apr - 6mayAll DayBaker Finalist Showcase

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Event Details

An exhibition of works by Finalists in the 2018 Baker Artist Awards, April 11–May 6

Opening reception: Wednesday, April 11, 6-9pm
At The Peale Center

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS:

In the Visual Arts category:
Laura Amussen, Noa Heyne, Christine Neill, Rachel Rotenberg, Susan Waters-Eller

In the Interdisciplinary Arts category:
Erick Antonio Benitez, Abraham Burickson, Jeffrey Gangwisch, Fred Scharmen, Stewart Watson

Following the opening, self-guided visits are free, by appointment, on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays from 12-6pm, and Sundays from 10-4pm. Book your visit here: https://calendly.com/thepeale/visit

ABOUT THE BAKER ARTIST PORTFOLIOS:
The Baker Artist Portfolios were created to support artists and promote Greater Baltimore as a strong creative community. The online portfolios are open to artists working in all disciplines who live and work in Baltimore City and its five surrounding counties. The portfolios expose area artists’ work to regional, national and international audiences. The site has been viewed by hundreds of thousands of art lovers, critics, gallery owners, academics, and leaders in creative business in nearly every country around the globe.

The portfolios and associated awards were established by the William G. Baker, Jr. Memorial Fund and are a program of the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance.

View all of the portfolios at www.BakerArtist.org

For more information on the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance, please visit www.BaltimoreCulture.org

Time

April 11 (Wednesday) - May 6 (Sunday)

Location

The Peale Center

225 North Holliday Street, Baltimore MD 21202

12apr - 30All DayJulio Fine Arts 2018 Annual Student Exhibition

Event Details

Reception
Thursday, April 19, 5-7 p.m. in the gallery
All events are free and open to the public.

Time

april 12 (Thursday) - 30 (Monday)

Location

Julio Fine Arts, Loyola University Maryland

4501 North Charles Street, Baltimore MD 21210

13apr - 31mayAll DayZone | David Humphrey

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St. Charles is thrilled to announce David Humphrey’s upcoming solo exhibition Zone featuring recent paintings on vinyl. In Zone street side observations conjure figurative hallucinations through gestural paint.

 

These new paintings on printed vinyl are David Humphrey’s way to collaborate with photos taken on a smartphone while pacing through his daily routine. The images are mostly from his neighborhood in Long Island City, which is rapidly converting from light manufacturing to glassy residential high-rises. One of the remaining business’ he passes every day is an awning and sign manufacturer that prints inexpensive banners for Humphrey to besmirch with acrylic paint. Piles of garbage, construction debris or dirty curbside snow become associative springboards for Humphrey’s animating imagination. His painted marks erase, vandalize or conscript elements of the printed photos to make new narratives, as if to awaken stories lying dormant in the detritus of urban space.

 

www.stcharlesprojects.com, St. Charles 2701 N Charles St.

Time

April 13 (Friday) - May 31 (Thursday)

Location

St. Charles Projects

2701 N Charles Street, Baltimore MD

13apr - 23mayAll DayNia Hampton: Drapetomania

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Event Details

Waller Gallery is pleased to present its first show and Nia Hampton’s first solo exhibition. The exhibition is an expansive documentation of the artist’s photography within Afro-Latino communities.

Drapetomania​ was once a medical diagnosis used to explain why enslaved Africans ran away from the plantation. This was a racist and fabricated diagnosis of the human imperative to flee servitude. In her first solo exhibition, Nia Hampton shows the results of her own bout of “drapetomania” after graduating college and moving to Brazil. She captured the following on her journey through South America: environmental racism, African spiritual practices, femicide, black Brazilian feminism, haircut culture, and Love.

Nia Hampton​ is a writer, filmmaker, photographer, teacher, and producer born and raised in Baltimore. Her videography and production has been featured in Al Jazeera America and film festivals in Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Johannesburg. Her written work has been featured in Vice, VillageVoice.com, City Paper, Dazed Digital, AFROPUNK, True Laurels, Genius.com, Paste Magazine, Griots Republic and Hysteria Zine.

Hampton will be giving two artists talks free of charge on April 21st and May 19th. These events will act as a more in-depth conversation about her work and share her knowledge with a wide ranging audience. We will have a closing event featuring a performance on May 25th.

Waller Gallery​ is a multidisciplinary art gallery focusing on art created by people of color. Conceived in 2017, by curator and scholar Joy Davis, Waller Gallery has a vision to support artists in Baltimore, the US, and globally through exhibitions, programming, and collaborative projects.

The gallery considers all forms of art including design, social practice, craft, and digital art. We are passionate about engaging with artists at any stage of their practice. Notwithstanding the current political assault on artists, especially queer and poc artists, we stand with them and will continue the tradition of black owned businesses in Baltimore.

For all press inquiries, contact Joy Davis at 443-879-9731 or ​[email protected]​.

Time

April 13 (Friday) - May 23 (Wednesday)

Location

Waller Gallery

2420 Calvert Street, Baltimore MD 21218

13apr - 29All DayMICA GRAD SHOW III

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Event Details

MICA’s Office of Graduate Studies is delighted to announce GRAD SHOW III, featuring students from the MFA, Community Arts, LeRoy E. Hoffberger, Mount Royal School of Art, Photographic and Electronic Media, and Rinehart School of Sculpture. MICA GRAD SHOW III will be on view April 13th – April 29th in Riggs and Leidy Gallery, Lazarus Center. Opening Reception, Saturday, April 14th, 5PM – 8:30PM.

Visit micagradshow.com for a complete schedule of exhibitions, film screenings, public programs, and student-curated installations throughout Baltimore city.

Time

april 13 (Friday) - 29 (Sunday)

Location

MICA Sheila & Richard Riggs & Leidy Gallery

131 West North Avenue Baltimore MD 21201

14apr - 26mayAll DayReinvented

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Event Details

Baltimore Clayworks is excited to host the exhibition REINVENTED, from April 14th through May 26th, in our Main Gallery.  Curated by Adam Chau, Program Manager at Clay Art Center in New York, this groundbreaking show features 12 artists who utilize digital technology in a traditional studio practice. Each artist explores, experiments, and collaborates with new technologies including 3d printing, laser cutting, 3d scanning, CNC routing, and more.

In addition to REINVENTED  the back room of our gallery will be occupied by the Towson University Object Lab and their work from the collaborative class between computer assisted design and ceramic craftsmanship. This melding of the digital and analog will be represented in prototypes, process molds, and finished projects.

Please join us to celebrate the opening on Saturday evening, April 14, from 6 to 8pm. More info: 410-578-1919.

Time

April 14 (Saturday) - May 26 (Saturday)

Location

Baltimore Clayworks

5707 Smith Avenue, Baltimore MD 21209

14apr - 9junAll DayDamsels in Distress- Black Edge Wall Sculpture by Anna U. Davis

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Event Details

Galerie Myrtis is pleased to present its first solo exhibition by graphic mixed-media artist Anna U. Davis. In “Damsels in Distress – Black Edge Wall Sculptures” Davis critically examines issues of sexual harassment and gender inequality. By combing black and white ink, and acrylic paint to contoured birch plywood, Davis creates sculptural figures that explore misogynistic behavior and investigates the physical and emotional impact through her personal lens.

The opening reception will be held on Saturday, April 14, from 4:00 – 6:00 pm. The exhibit runs from April 14th through June 9th. Visit website for programming information. www.GalerieMyrtis.net

“We only see the top of the iceberg. What lurks beneath, are stereotypes highly steeped in tradition, culture and religious beliefs. These stereotypes are holding women back from reaching their full potential. It will take all of us to change this pattern. Men have to take action, instead of sitting on the sidelines and accepting the sexist behavior that occurs in daily interactions. Men need to speak up and show by example their disapproval of these attitudes. Women should empower each other and not undermine each other. We are not enemies, even though I have witnessed the repeated interaction between women that reinforce the very things that keep us down. Women are so often portrayed and treated as victims in need of rescuing, hence the title of the show “Damsels in Distress.”
– Anna U. Davis

Time

April 14 (Saturday) - June 9 (Saturday)

Location

Galerie Myrtis

2224 North Charles Street, Baltimore MD 21218

14apr - 5mayAll DayMoving WallsArt Installation

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Event Details

Noa Heyne, Sidney Pink, Sarah Smith, Matthew Williams, and Khristian Weeks

Exhibition open April 14–May 5. Self-guided visits are free with timed entry until closing on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays from 12-6pm, and Sundays from 10-4pm. Book your visit here.

Performances Saturday April 28, 8pm; Sunday April 29, 7pm; Thursday May 3, 8pm; Saturday May 5, 8pm. Get tickets here for the dance performances.

Moving Walls is an experimental dance piece that examines human experience in relation to architecture. Combining movement with sculpture, animation, and sound, the piece is a collaborative project that questions our concepts of stability. With wheels, ropes, pulleys, hooks, and hinges, three performers construct and deconstruct the space around them. In turn, they are influenced by their shifting surroundings.

Audience members are invited to explore their own unique perspectives of Moving Walls by passing freely throughout different rooms of The Peale Center. The Peale’s rich and complex history of preservation, including former exhibitions on taxidermy and the building’s own physical restoration, provides a visual and conceptual framework for the performance.

Outside the performances, Moving Walls is open to the public as an art installation, April 14th- May 5th.

Time

April 14 (Saturday) - May 5 (Saturday)

Location

The Peale Center

225 North Holliday Street, Baltimore MD 21202

15apr - 14mayAll DayMatthew FREEL "American Olympus" PaintingsOpening Reception

Event Details

Matthew Freel paints superheroes. Intertwined with historical figures & deities, the paintings evoke a search for American identity. These flawed heroes reflect our great ambitions, actions and failures. Blurred painting embodies the motion, violence and muscularity of American myth.

http://www.matthewfreel.com/

Time

April 15 (Sunday) - May 14 (Monday)

Location

Project 1628

1628 Bolton Street, Baltimore MD

16apr - 27All DayLaylaa Randera: A Transnational Struggle: Truths and Transitions | MFA Thesis Show

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Event Details

Gallery 102 presents A Transnational Struggle: Truths and Transitions. The MFA Thesis Show by Laylaa Randera explores how protest movements form and deteriorate, how the culture of resistance spreads across nations, how participants, activists, and advocates interact and respond through gesture and expression, as well as how the opposite—censoring, disenfranchisement, exploitation, commodification—is signified and negotiated over history. I am interested in the many parallels between the political and social landscapes of South Africa and the USA as a catalyst for a transnational dialogue. I draw on an archive of images as well as my own photographs. By using everyday materials such as cardboard to replicate canonical high-brow artwork, repurposing the triptych form, I relocate the subject’s place in history. Working with cardboard makes me think about the degradation of things. The themes of memory and remembrance become essential to the trajectory of culture, and the uncertainty of how long it will last. These materials also allude to the “DIY”, immediate, and urgent creation of protest apparatus. I am interested in the way the archive, myth, iconography and symbolism reoccur in protest movements, and the transnational dialogue that has developed through gestures, settings, faces, figures, and actions.

PROGRAMS & EVENTS

Friday, April 27, 6:00-8:00 pm: Closing reception of A Transnational Struggle: Truths and Transitions. The reception is free and open to the public. To RSVP, click here.

ARTIST

Laylaa Randera looks at the immediate urgency of current political and social issues while reflecting on transnational histories. She is interested in the way the archive, myth, iconography and symbolism relate to the contemporary world. As a photographer, she turns her lens on the unseen side, explores the notions of visibility and invisibility, and tropes of gender and race. She aims to subvert and obscure the “status quo”. Her image-making process has expanded from primarily social documentary photography to include abstraction, diaristic photography, and multimedia artworks.  Although her themes and subject matter are diverse, her focus is largely geared towards contemporary social disturbances—from protests and rallies to underground music events. She participates in groups that are part of her direct environment, and creates visual conduits to conversation. Also, being native to South Africa, she looks for ways to bring its social climate into a global dialogue.

Gallery 102
Gallery 102 and the Student Exhibitions Committee (SEC) is committed to the exhibiting of contemporary art, including work from GW & Corcoran students, DC-area artists, and nationally recognized artists of all medium. The SEC consists of GW & Corcoran students — undergraduate and graduate, majors and non-majors, artists and art historians — who both develop innovative, original, and thought-provoking exhibitions throughout GW’s campus and invite a select group of guest curators to present exhibitions each semester. The gallery provides practical curatorial experience to the student body. Students have the opportunity to exhibit work, curate shows, and install exhibitions.

Time

april 16 (Monday) - 27 (Friday)

Location

Gallery 102

801 22nd St NW, Washington DC 20052

17apr - 25mayAll DayWhen Living is a Protest Opening Reception + Artist Talk

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Event Details

When Living is a Protest will be presented at Goucher College’s Silber Art Gallery in the Sandy J. Unger Athenaeum from April 17 through May 25. This exhibit, which is free, open to the public, and accessible to all, can be viewed Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

ABOUT THE EXHIBIT

When Living is a Protest will feature news images by photographer, humanist, and activist Radcliffe (Ruddy) Roye ’98. In this ongoing body of work, Roye approaches protest with sophistication and emotional intelligence. A contributor for National Geographic, TIME, and The New York Times, his work has also appeared in The New Yorker, Vogue, Ebony, Fast Company, BET, and ESPN. He was named TIME Instagram photographer of 2016.

Time

April 17 (Tuesday) - May 25 (Friday)

Location

Silber Gallery @ Goucher College

1021 Dulaney Valley Road, Towson MD 21204

17apr - 11mayAll DaySenior Capstone Exhibitions

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Event Details

Works by graduating art students at McDaniel College are highlighted in two Senior Capstone Exhibitions. Both exhibitions take place in Rice Gallery, Peterson Hall, at McDaniel College, 2 College Hill, Westminster, Md.

 

The exhibitions feature a variety of media, from traditional two- and three-dimensional works to digital and new media.

 

“HeadSPACE” runs Tuesday, April 17Friday, April 27, with an opening reception on Tuesday, April 17, 5:307:30 p.m., including a gallery talk at 6 p.m. Students showcasing their works are Amitis Aidun of Gaithersburg, Md., Kristopher Orth of Taneytown, Md., Morgan Shugars of Royal Oak, Md., Leah Sparks of Lawrence, Mass., and Monique Staveley of Sykesville, Md.

 

Amitis Aidun’s work reflects the “therapeutic power of art” and “gives the impression of what it feels like living with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder,” while Kristopher Orth’s drawings are influenced by High Renaissance painters, such as Da Vinci, Michelangelo, Caravaggio and Raphael.

 

Morgan Shugars says his fascination with art began with graphic design “because of how simple, yet creative it can be and how it is seen in every single product.”

Leah Sparks explores her identity as a female of Puerto Rican descent, specifically the Taino tribe, and says that her work “aims to convey an admiration for bodies that are not generally celebrated; those that are curvy, thick and belong to women who are minorities.”

 

Monique Staveley’s pen and ink drawings separated with panels tell the story of a college-age girl getting through menial tasks that turn into larger-than-life problems.

 

“Impermanence runs Tuesday, May 1Friday, May 11, with an opening reception on Tuesday, May 1, 5:307:30 p.m., including a gallery talk at 6 p.m. Students with works in the exhibition are Caitlin Eversmier of Cockeysville, Md., Maura Lampe of Brookeville, Md., Roger McGuinn of Warrenton, Va., and Rachel Wojnar of Cumberland, Md.

 

Caitlin Eversmier’s prints and drawings highlight the issues of anthropogenic pollution, specifically plastics and their effects on both marine organisms and humans.

 

Maura Lampe uses a variety of media to explore the Japanese concept of wabi-sabi, the awareness and acceptance of life’s impermanence, as well as its cycles.

 

Roger McGuinn’s work comes from the farms that he has worked on and hunted on in Northern Virginia for most of his life, while Rachel Wojnar’s body of work revolves around the relationships between humanity and the natural world.

 

Both exhibitions and receptions are free and open to the public. Rice Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, noon–4 p.m., and Saturday, noon–5 p.m. Call 410-857-2595 for more information. Visit www.mcdaniel.edu for information about McDaniel College.

Time

April 17 (Tuesday) - May 11 (Friday)

Location

McDaniel College

2 College Hill, Westminster MD 21157

20apr - 26mayAll DaySirens: New Works by the JV Collective

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Event Details

Join us Friday, April 20 from 6 – 9pm for the opening of Sirens: New Works by the JV Collective.

To tempt, to seduce, to bewitch, to entrap, to wink, to flash, to caution, to scream. The duality of Sirens conjures vivid images that can be linked to the powerful capabilities of jewelry. Sirens is a collection of new work from the JV Collective, a group of six female artists based in Philadelphia. Together they create a diverse range of work which becomes unified and connected through the multiplicitous nature and concept of the siren. The spectrum of work includes surreal creatures which create their own mythology, works that seduce through their compelling use of line, texture, or sensual materials, works that shout and signal in vibrant colors using bold graphic imagery and works that alert and call attention to inequity and prejudice. The image of a siren as a powerful woman is evident as the members of the JV Collective explore the nature of femininity, feminism, and the female form.

JV Collective is:
Melanie Bilenker, Leslie Boyd, Sarah Rachel Brown, Emily Cobb,
Maria Eife, Mallory Weston

Exhibition dates: April 20 – May 26, 2018
with an opening reception April 20, 6 – 9 pm

There will be an Artist Panel discussion as well as a onsite recording of the Perceived Value podcast at the opening reception.

http://melaniebilenker.com/
http://www.lesliedboyd.com/
http://www.sarahrachelbrown.com/
https://www.emily-cobb.com/
http://www.mariaeife.com/
https://malloryweston.com/

Time

April 20 (Friday) - May 26 (Saturday)

Location

Baltimore Jewelry Center

10 East North Avenue, Baltimore MD 21201

21apr - 25mayAll DayTwo Painters: A Visual Dialogue | Lois Dodd and Colleen Cox

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Event Details

gallery neptune & brown is proud to present two American artists, Lois Dodd and Colleen Cox, in an exhibition showcasing oil and watercolor paintings representative of their long careers. Two Painters: A Visual Dialogue is the first exhibition which places Dodd and Cox in conversation—as teacher and student at Brooklyn College during the 1990s. Both practitioners of ‘deep observation’ of their surroundings, these artists employ similar artistic techniques as they explore the formal and abstract elements of color, shape, and light of still life objects and landscapes.

A founding member of the iconic Tanager Gallery, (part of the 10th Street Galleries in New York) Dodd was a transformative figure in the tradition of American painting. A committed student of her surroundings, she focuses mostly on still life painting, nudes, and landscapes. Frequently painting familiar scenes in New Jersey, Maine, and New York City, her work embodies the nature of intimate everyday moments. These daily scenes are rendered with a deep understanding of elegant light and form that is indicative of the simple yet striking beauty of nature. Today, Dodd’s work is found in the Museum of Modern Art, the Cooper Hewitt Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the National Academy of Design in New York. A life-long teacher of painting, Dodd spent much of her career as a professor at Brooklyn College from 1971 to 1992, where she guided a new generation of American artist with an unpretentious and candid spirit.

 

One of these artists was Colleen Cox, who received her MFA from Brooklyn College in 1992. Influenced by Manet’s still life paintings and Morandi’s graceful oil paintings of the 1940s, she studied under renowned American artist Lennart Anderson, from whom she was encouraged to continue her interest in painting from direct observation. Cox also cites Dodd as an important influence on her work, commenting, “Lois’ art gave me a deep appreciation for the vast range of expression that is possible even within the most restrained basic principles of design.” Concentrating primarily on landscape and still life painting, Cox uses soft, quiet northern light to create a radiance and tranquility through intuitive rendering of form and color. The varied works of Cox and Dodd in Two Painters: A Visual Dialogue emphasize a beautiful tradition of masterful artistic practice and the elegance of the familiar.

image credit:

Lois Dodd

Fall Color, Ridgefield, Connecticut (Sally)

Time

April 21 (Saturday) - May 25 (Friday)

Location

gallery neptune & brown

1530 14th St NW Washington, District of Columbia

22apr - 29julAll DayOdyssey: Jack Whitten Sculpture

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Event Details

This spring, The Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) will present the first exhibition dedicated tosculptures by renowned contemporary artist Jack Whitten. Odyssey: Jack Whitten Sculpture, 1963-2016, on view April 22 through July 29, 2018, reveals an extensive and entirely unknown body of the artist’s work. Co-organized with The Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met),Odyssey features 40 of Whitten’s sculptures made in Greece over the course of his five-decade career. Created from a diverse spectrum of materials—including wood, marble, copper, bone, fishing wire, and personal mementos—the works are contextualized with African, Minoan, and Cycladic sculptures and objects that inspired Whitten through the years. The exhibition also unites Whitten’s Black Monoliths series for the first time to reveal how sculpture influenced his paintings. This ticketed exhibition is curated by Katy Siegel, BMA Senior Programming and Research Curator and Thaw Chair in Modern American Art at Stony Brook University, and Kelly Baum, Cynthia Hazen Polsky, and Leon Polsky Curator of Contemporary Art at The Met.

 

“What’s especially notable about Odyssey: Jack Whitten Sculpture is that we are not only diversifying the approach we take to examine an artist, but are looking at a completely unexplored yet very rich facet of the artist’s oeuvre,” said BMA Dorothy Wagner Wallis Director Christopher Bedford. “We’re especially pleased to collaborate with The Met, such an influential source for Whitten in his early years, and to explore the full spectrum of Whitten’s practice and illustrate how his sculptures have informed his widely admired paintings.”

 

Whitten is one of the most important artists of his generation and a major influencer of younger African American artists. His paintings range from figurative work addressing Civil Rights in the 1960s to ground-breaking experimentation with abstraction in the 70s and 80s to recent work that memorializes historical figures of Black culture such as Ralph Ellison and W.E.B. Du Bois. Whitten began carving wood in the 1960s in order to understand African sculpture, both aesthetically and in terms of his own identity as an African American. The work grew in unexpected ways when in 1969 he began spending summers on the Greek island of Crete. There, Whitten was inspired by the ancient Cycladic and Minoan work of the region, recognizing their functional role in society as repositories of power, memory, sensuality, and spirituality, much like the African works he had seen in New York institutions. The resourcefulness of the people of Crete and their connection to nature and to material life recalled his own upbringing in Alabama. In Crete, his materials expanded to incorporate local wood and marble, as well as bones left over from his fishing excursions. These organic materials—shaped by techniques such as carving, burning, and aggregation—imbued his works with a profound connection to ritual, nature, and the most fundamental experiences of human life. Whitten sees his own work as the just the latest episode in a long history of exchange between Africa, the African diaspora, and the Mediterranean. As the artist wrote in his studio log in 1975, “I am aware of the fact that this is the tradition in Art which I must connect with—a work of art with a function motivated by the tradition of African sculpture—MY WAY—not Picasso’s European interpretation.”

 

Time

April 22 (Sunday) - July 29 (Sunday)

Location

Baltimore Museum of Art

10 Art Museum Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218-3898

25apr7:00 pm- 8:30 pmEllen Lupton Presents: Interface

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Event Details

The interaction of humans and machines is a vital area of design practice. How do we control the things around us—and how do they control us?

Critic, curator, and historian Ellen Lupton explores the evolution of design for interaction, from past to future, physical to virtual, body to mind, utopia to dystopia.
Ellen Lupton is Senior Curator of Contemporary Design at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum in New York City. Her exhibition, The Senses: Design Beyond Visionw opens April 13, 2018. Lupton also serves as director of the Graphic Design MFA Program at MICA (Maryland Institute College of Art) in Baltimore, where she has authored numerous books on design processes. Her most recent book, Design Is Storytelling, was published by Cooper Hewitt in 2017.

Parking Map
http://www.ndm.edu/sites/default/files/pdf prezrezcampusmap_0.pdf

Time

(Wednesday) 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Location

Notre Dame of Maryland University

4701 North Charles Street, Baltimore MD 21210

25apr8:00 pmDurand Jones & the Indications

Event Details

Durand Jones & the Indications at Ottobar
with guests
Aztec Sun
Super City

Time

(Wednesday) 8:00 pm

Location

The Ottobar

2549 North Howard Street, Baltimore Maryland 21218

26apr - 9junAll DayJae Ko: Escalante

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Jae Ko: Escalante

April 26 – June 9, 2018

Opening Reception: Thursday, April 26 6-8pm

For her solo debut at C. Grimaldis Gallery, Ko creates a site-specific installation entitled Escalante, the newest iteration in the artist’s Force of Nature series. Inspired by the canyons of southern Utah, Ko reconstructs the sandstone landforms with their curvilinear, gradated walls. The towering sculptural relief is created from cascading rolls of paper stacked floor to ceiling and shaped to fit the architecture of the gallery. Utilitarian Kraft paper transforms the gallery walls into undulating surfaces of intertwining light and shadow and immeasurable pages in suspended motion.

Escalante is accompanied by a selection of paper sculptures that trace Ko’s continuous experimentation with the material. She works by laboriously unwinding, and re-spooling miles of adding machine tape and submerging it in ink and graphite powder. As it dries, the paper swells into soft, biomorphic forms saturated with delicate lines. In recent works, rolled paper is shaped and thoroughly coated in glue, resulting in flawlessly engineered spirals that float weightlessly on the surface.

Born in Korea, Jae Ko received her BFA from Wako University, Tokyo in 1988 and her MFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore in 1998. She received the Anonymous Was A Woman grant in 2012 and the Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant in 2002. Formerly based in D.C. and Virginia, artist now works and lives in Maryland’s Western Shore. Her work is in the collection of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C. and numerous private collections throughout the United States.

Time

April 26 (Thursday) - June 9 (Saturday)

Location

C. Grimaldis Gallery

523 North Charles Street Baltimore MD 21201

26apr - 9junAll DayNora Sturges: On Certain Floors, Certain Wonders

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Nora Sturges: On Certain Floors, Certain Wonders

April 26 – June 9, 2018

Opening Reception: Thursday, April 26 6-8pm

On certain floors
certain wonders.
Pale dirty light,
some captured iceberg
being prevented from melting.
See the mechanical moons,
sick, being made
to wax and wane
at somebody’s instigation.

— Elizabeth Bishop, Varick Street

C. Grimaldis Gallery is pleased to present On Certain Floors, Certain Wonders, an exhibition of recent paintings by Nora Sturges which depict an imagined world of arctic ruin.

Strange scenes of a desolate land are occupied by man-made objects and structures – a tarmac, satellite dish, stanchions and wood planks. Vacant rooms and hallways of industrial banality suggest a subterranean facility where life has retreated indoors. The sparseness and specificity of these ordinary subjects, added to the intimate scale and detailed brushwork of Sturges’s paintings, inspire a complex narrative of life on a distant frontier. Although devoid of any human figure, these works signal a lingering presence of some unknown inhabitant, recently departed.

Nora Sturges received her BA in studio art from Bowdoin College and her MFA in painting from Ohio University. She has exhibited widely throughout the U.S. and internationally, including recent group exhibitions in Toronto, Berlin and Montreal. She is the recipient of three Individual Artist Awards from the Maryland State Arts Council. Sturges currently lives and works in Baltimore, where she is a professor and head of Painting and Drawing at Towson University.

Time

April 26 (Thursday) - June 9 (Saturday)

Location

C. Grimaldis Gallery

523 North Charles Street Baltimore MD 21201

26apr7:00 amInside Look LIVE: The Book of Joseph

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Event Details

Thursday, April 26th from 7:00 pm
Featuring members of the Everyman cast of The Book of Joseph and Director Noah Himmelstein

Meet the makers of Everyman Theatre’s forthcoming production of The Book of Joseph, by playwright Karen Hartman, during an intimate evening discussing the adaptation of a true story for the stage—featuring a reading of selected scenes, and a conversation with director Noah Himmelstein and special guest Richard Hollander, upon whose family story (chronicled in his book, Every Day Lasts a Year: A Jewish Family’s Correspondence from Poland) the play is based.

Dessert will be served following the program (dietary laws observed).

Time

(Thursday) 7:00 am

Location

Jewish Museum of Maryland

15 Lloyd Street, Baltimore 21215

26apr5:00 pm- 7:00 pmHealthcare for the Homeless Client Art Show

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Event Details

http://www.hchmd.org/client-art-show

“Art can be a way for us to communicate…and to bridge gaps between different ages, genders and neighborhoods,” says Mako Williams, an artist and Health Care for the Homeless client.

Every spring at Health Care for the Homeless, our staff and clients come together with community members to celebrate art with Our Work, an exhibit of artwork by our clients. While art is an important form of expression for many of our clients who attend art group year-round here at Health Care for the Homeless, our spring art show creates an opportunity for different segments of our city to come together out of a shared love of art—and to celebrate our clients as artists first and foremost, versus individuals experiencing homelessness. And the possibilities for our joint efforts to end homelessness flow from there…

Join us for our annual client art show on Thursday, April 26, 5-7 p.m. Enjoy artwork that spans a range of media, meet the artists, purchase their art and enjoy fellowship with others committed to building a just society for all.

Health Care for the Homeless works to prevent and end homelessness for vulnerable individuals and families by providing quality, integrated health care and promoting access to affordable housing and sustainable incomes through direct service, advocacy and community engagement.

Time

(Thursday) 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Location

Healthcare for the Homeless

421 Fallsway, Baltimore 21202

26apr6:00 pm- 8:00 pmJae Ko: EscalanteOpening Reception

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Event Details

Jae Ko: Escalante

April 26 – June 9, 2018

Opening Reception: Thursday, April 26 6-8pm

For her solo debut at C. Grimaldis Gallery, Ko creates a site-specific installation entitled Escalante, the newest iteration in the artist’s Force of Nature series. Inspired by the canyons of southern Utah, Ko reconstructs the sandstone landforms with their curvilinear, gradated walls. The towering sculptural relief is created from cascading rolls of paper stacked floor to ceiling and shaped to fit the architecture of the gallery. Utilitarian Kraft paper transforms the gallery walls into undulating surfaces of intertwining light and shadow and immeasurable pages in suspended motion.

Escalante is accompanied by a selection of paper sculptures that trace Ko’s continuous experimentation with the material. She works by laboriously unwinding, and re-spooling miles of adding machine tape and submerging it in ink and graphite powder. As it dries, the paper swells into soft, biomorphic forms saturated with delicate lines. In recent works, rolled paper is shaped and thoroughly coated in glue, resulting in flawlessly engineered spirals that float weightlessly on the surface.

Born in Korea, Jae Ko received her BFA from Wako University, Tokyo in 1988 and her MFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore in 1998. She received the Anonymous Was A Woman grant in 2012 and the Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant in 2002. Formerly based in D.C. and Virginia, artist now works and lives in Maryland’s Western Shore. Her work is in the collection of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C. and numerous private collections throughout the United States.

Time

(Thursday) 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Location

C. Grimaldis Gallery

523 North Charles Street Baltimore MD 21201

26apr6:00 pm- 8:00 pmNora Sturges: On Certain Floors, Certain WondersOpening Reception

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Event Details

Nora Sturges: On Certain Floors, Certain Wonders

April 26 – June 9, 2018

Opening Reception: Thursday, April 26 6-8pm

On certain floors
certain wonders.
Pale dirty light,
some captured iceberg
being prevented from melting.
See the mechanical moons,
sick, being made
to wax and wane
at somebody’s instigation.

— Elizabeth Bishop, Varick Street

C. Grimaldis Gallery is pleased to present On Certain Floors, Certain Wonders, an exhibition of recent paintings by Nora Sturges which depict an imagined world of arctic ruin.

Strange scenes of a desolate land are occupied by man-made objects and structures – a tarmac, satellite dish, stanchions and wood planks. Vacant rooms and hallways of industrial banality suggest a subterranean facility where life has retreated indoors. The sparseness and specificity of these ordinary subjects, added to the intimate scale and detailed brushwork of Sturges’s paintings, inspire a complex narrative of life on a distant frontier. Although devoid of any human figure, these works signal a lingering presence of some unknown inhabitant, recently departed.

Nora Sturges received her BA in studio art from Bowdoin College and her MFA in painting from Ohio University. She has exhibited widely throughout the U.S. and internationally, including recent group exhibitions in Toronto, Berlin and Montreal. She is the recipient of three Individual Artist Awards from the Maryland State Arts Council. Sturges currently lives and works in Baltimore, where she is a professor and head of Painting and Drawing at Towson University.

Time

(Thursday) 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Location

C. Grimaldis Gallery

523 North Charles Street Baltimore MD 21201

26apr6:00 pm- 8:00 pm2018 AIA Baltimore and BAF Spring Lecture Series: Empowerment

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Event Details

1.5 AIA/CES HSW LUs Available

FREE to attend, registration required. Lecture begins at 6:00 pm followed by a reception.

REGISTER NOW

This year’s Spring Lecture Series theme is Empowerment, Access, Co-Creation, Ethics. At the core of many of our social challenges is an asymmetrical power dynamic. This series explores the role of power in design and what it looks like for designers to facilitate its redistribution.

26 April 2018: Empowerment

Speaker: James Mitchell, Orkidstudio. Nairobi, Kenya.

Orkidstudio focuses on the process of construction to affect social change and empower people through the sharing of skills and knowledge on site. The firm’s mission is to create high quality and affordable buildings that significantly impact health and promote education and equality. Orkidstudio works collectively with the local community, hiring workers living closest to sites, investing in workforce development, and building with local materials from local suppliers.

Reception sponsored by Gutierrez Studios

Event Logistics

Lectures are held at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) in Falvey Hall of the Brown Center.

Public Transit:
The lecture location is within walking distance of several public transit options including:
-UB/Mount Royal Light Rail Stop
-Circulator Bus (Purple Line) at N. Charles and Mount Royal Avenue
-Penn Station: Amtrak/MARC

Parking:
100 free parking spots will be available in the RK&K parking lot at 81 W Mosher St, Baltimore. The lot is located at the east end of Mosher Street, one block east of Mt. Royal Avenue and accessible from the northbound lane only. The lot will close at 9pm.

Schedule

15 March 2018: Ethics
Dr. Thomas Seager, Arizona State University, School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment. Tempe, Arizona.

29 March 2018: Access
Krista Knightengale, Better Block Foundation. Dallas, Texas.
Sponsored by MICA Architectural Design

19 April 2018: Co-Creation
Jae Shin & Damon Rich, Hector Design. Newark, New Jersey.
Sponsored by Maryland ASLA

26 April 2018: Empowerment
James Mitchell, Orkidstudio. Nairobi, Kenya.
Reception sponsored by Gutierrez Studios

 

Time

(Thursday) 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Location

MICA Brown Center, Falvey Hall

1301 West Mount Royal Avenue, Baltimore Maryland 21217

26apr7:00 pmOff-the-Page: Creative Conversation Series With Temple Crocker and Jen Grow

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Event Details

The Ivy Bookshop and the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance are excited to launch a new conversation series that pairs artists and writers whose work overlaps in a unique way. Join us for the inaugural conversation that pairs writer Jen Grow and theater artist Temple Crocker as they discuss issues of memory, loss, and identity.

Temple Crocker is a theater artist and teacher whose recent work investigated, embodied, and shared the stories of older adults living with dementia and memory loss. With this work, Temple hopes to provide an alternative to the cultural narrative that defines aging as a steady process of loss and degeneration, instead revealing the imaginative potential at every stage of life.

Jen Grow is an award-winning writer of fiction and nonfiction. In 2015, she made her first foray into a cross-disciplinary collaboration that resulted in My Father’s House, a series of photographs with a personal essay about the dismantling of her father’s house after his death, which explores ideas around loss of home, identity, and history.

The 2018 Off-the-Page conversation series is co-organized by the Ivy Bookshop and the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance.

Time

(Thursday) 7:00 pm

Location

Bird in Hand

11 E 33rd St, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA

26apr7:00 pm- 8:00 pmMorgan at the Walters

Event Details

Free

Following the impressive faculty spotlight concert in the fall, this program features promising student talent from Morgan State University’s music department. The repertoire will feature both vocal and instrumental favorites presented on the museum’s Sculpture Court.

Presented in partnership with Morgan State University.

Time

(Thursday) 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Location

The Walters Art Museum

600 North Charles Street, Baltimore MD 21201

27apr - 15mayAll DayMaya Freelon // Amber Robles-Gordon

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Event Details

Rebirth/Rebound
Tissue ink monoprints by MAYA FREELON

Third Eye Open
Mixed media artworks by AMBER ROBLES-GORDON

 

Friday, April 27th – May 15th, 2018

OPENING RECEPTION
Friday, April 27th, 6pm-8pm
Both artists will be in attendance.

About MAYA FREELON & Rebirth/Rebound

In 2005, I lived with my grandmother while working on my MFA at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. I discovered a beautiful accident in her basement, a stack of tissue paper stained by water from a leaking pipe. I was initially drawn to the intricate pattern left on the paper. The way the water stained the paper reminded me of the old drop ceiling tiles I would stare at when I was bored in elementary school. Finding the watermarked paper changed the entire trajectory of my artistic career.

I utilize the ink from “bleeding” tissue paper to create ​Tissue Ink Monoprints​, the tissue paper is then dried, ripped and reformed into ​Tissue Quilts​ and sculptures. I also create ​Tissue Spirals​ out of paper, using the smallest scraps of paper and tape. By incorporating archival photographs, both from my family and found, I developed a process called ​Tissue Ink Mono/Photo Prints, ​which is a blending of a high contrast black and white scanned photography, and a Tissue Ink Monoprint. My most recent experimentation incorporates the use of a pottery wheel, which creates a visual vortex, resulting in ​Spinning Tissue Ink Monoprints​, and ​Spinning Tissue Ink Mono/Photo Prints​.

Both delicate and resilient, the use of tissue paper poses questions surrounding preservation, “high” and “low” art, and the attribution of value. What fuels our desire to protect? How much pressure is needed until something is ripped? Is it destroyed? Can one find strength and power in fragility? Do you still appreciate the beauty of now, even if you know it will ultimately fade away?

Combining tissue paper as a medium, with my own personal struggles, allows me to visualize the whimsical nature of emotions. Specifically my challenges surrounding the death of my newborn son, depression, divorce and rebirth. The intrinsic impermanence of tissue paper continues to intrigue me, even after 13 years of working with the medium, I’m still discovering new ways to play.
-MAYA FREELON, 2018

MAYA FREELON, Bubble 1, 2017, 44″x33″, tissue ink monoprint

MAYA FREELON
(Durham, NC, b. USA)

Maya Freelon is an award-winning visual artist whose work was described by the late poet ​Maya Angelou as “visualizing the truth about the vulnerability and power of the human being.” Cosmopolitan magazine featured her in June 2015 in “Art Stars” calling her one “of the most badass female artists in the biz.”  She was commissioned by Google to design original art for their​ OnHub router, by ​Cadillac to create a live-sculpture for their Dare Greatly creative campaign, and by the ​North Carolina Museum of Art to  create a collaborative tissue paper sculpture celebrating the opening of their African Art wing. Her unique tissue paper art, praised by the ​International Review of African American Art as “a vibrant, beating assemblage of color,” has been exhibited internationally, including shows in France, Jamaica, Madagascar, and Italy. She was selected by ​Modern Luxury magazine as Best of the City; by Huffington Post as “​Black Artists: 30 Contemporary Art Makers Under 40 You Should Know​”; and by ​Complex magazine as “15 Young Black Artists Making Waves in the Art World​.”  Maya has completed residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine, the Korobitey Institute in Ghana, and the Brandywine Workshop in Philadelphia. She earned a BA from Lafayette College and an MFA from the School of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Available artwork by MAYA FREELON

About AMBER ROBLES-GORDON & Third Eye Open

Third Eye Open, represents an internal conversation about the inter-connectedness of human life, from the infinitesimal individual to the expanse in which our universe exists and operates within – yet there are laws of physics, and highly shared beliefs and practices that hinge or bind us together.

While creating this work I was processing research primarily from two past series: The Male and Femaleand Awakening the Matrilineal.

The Male and Female is a collection of four concentric circles, including The Male: The Male, The Architect, The Protector, as the outer circle. The inner circle is named The Universe. In The Female:, the outer circle is titled The Female, The Oracle, The Nurturer, while the inner circle is named The One, The Source Within.

Awakening the Matrilineal, the second series, includes five different circular works. This research included working with sacred geometry, the power of ancestral memories, cellular structure, cellular memory, genealogy and creating as a form of sacred practice and mediation. This led to my focus on developing an awareness of the third eye.

Depending on one’s spiritual and/or cultures beliefs it is also known as the 6th chakra or the pineal gland. The pineal gland, a pinecone-shaped organ, is centralized within the two hemispheres of a human brain. Among its secretion, this gland secretes melatonin, a hormone produced by the amount of light a person is exposed to and which regulates our circadian rhythms. Circadian rhythms “are the daily cycles of biological activity” that occur within the human body, some animals, and plant life. Hence this cycle is extremely important to our overall well-being.

Activation of the third eye chakra can connect one to their intuitive senses, heighten the ability to see energy, connect to the spiritual realm, enhance creativity and/or strengthen their linkage to universal inspiration. This meditative state of mind, is a means for further forging a relationship with self, others and with one’s environment.

While creating this work I knew it was about the human connection to the universe but purposely avoided honing in to further define the conversation until it was absolutely necessary. Prior to completing the work, I was listening to the SyFy channel and heard about the discovery of Kepler 19c. I was intrigued by the process, transit timing variation (TTY), used by scientists to deduce the existence of the planet Kepler 19c. As scientists were studying Kepler 19b, they realized it was not acquiescing to their formulaic equation. The planet kept orbiting five minutes before or after their estimated arrival time. Kepler 19b was under the gravitational hold of Kepler 19c’s orbit—it was under the influence of an invisible, yet an undeniably powerful force.

With these works, I am suggesting the process of transit timing variation and the exploration of third eye activation and other measures of self-exploration and self-growth are essential and parallel, ongoing conversations. I believe we most all be listening and mindful of the invisible forces that intertwine us all.
-AMBER ROBLES-GORDON, 2018

AMBER ROBLES-GORDON, Kepler 19-c and Kepler 19-b, 2018, 36″x36″, mixed media on canvas

AMBER ROBLES-GORDON
(Washington, DC b. USA)

Amber Robles-Gordon is a mixed media visual artist. She is known for her use of found objects and textile to create assemblages, large-scale sculptures and installations. Her work is representational of her experiences and the paradoxes within the female experience.

Robles-Gordon has over fifteen years of exhibiting, art education, and exhibition coordinating experience. She completed her Masters of Fine Arts from Howard University in November 2011, where she has received annual awards and accolades for her artwork. She has exhibited nationally and in Germany, Italy, Malaysia, London, and Spain. Additionally, she has been commissioned by the Smithsonian Anacostia Museum, Luther College, WETA Television, Al Jazeera, The Kojo Nnamdi Show, Howard University, David C. Driskell Center, the Phillips Collection, the African American Museum in Philadelphia and Mc Daniel College to teach workshops and present and speak about her artwork. Most recently, Robles-Gordon was selected for the Centro Cultural Costarricense-Norteamericano, Back the Roots, Teaching Residency in Limon, Costa Rica.

Throughout her career, she has served as an advocate for the Washington, DC area arts community. As of November 2004 through July 2012, Robles-Gordon has been an active member of the Black Artists DC, (BADC) serving as exhibitions coordinator, Vice President and President. Robles-Gordon is also the Co-Founder of Delusions of Grandeur Artist Collective. In 2012, Robles-Gordon was selected to present for the Under the Influence competition as part of the 30 Americans Exhibition at the Corcoran Gallery of Art.

This is Amber Robles-Gordon’s inaugural solo exhibition at Morton Fine Art in Washington, DC.

Available artwork by AMBER ROBLES-GORDON

Time

April 27 (Friday) - May 15 (Tuesday)

Location

Morton Fine Art LLC

1718 Florida Avenue NW, Washington DC 20009

27apr - 27mayAll DayGrant McFarland

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Event Details

Grant McFarland, Voyager, 2018, pine

April 27 – May 27, 2018

Common Ground Gallery, VisArts

Opening Reception and Artist Talk: Friday, May 4, 7 – 9 PM

 

Voyager, a solo exhibition of new sculpture by Grant McFarland, explores how the life cycle of individuals and their possessions are entwined. McFarland constructs a sculptural requiem for the things born out of a commodity culture. Possessions accompany their owners through time assuming a variety of roles as useful tools, hoarded junk, or valuable collections. Voyager is a symbolic funeral for the things that we make, accumulate, move around, pile up, and leave behind as symbols of endurance, but also of waste.

About the artist: Grant McFarland is a Maryland born, Washington DC based sculptor who graduated from University of Maryland in 2016 with a B.A. in studio art. He participated in the UMD Art Honors program and recently worked as a resident artist at Salem Art Works in Salem, New York. He has shown at 39th Street Gallery in Hyattsville, Maryland, the Stamp Student Union Gallery on campus at the University of Maryland, and McClean Project for the Arts in McClean, Virginia. His current work is concerned with asking questions of perception, interior and exterior in relation to inference and knowledge of the built environment.

www.grantmcfarland.com

Time

April 27 (Friday) - May 27 (Sunday)

Location

VisArts

155 Gibbs Street, Rockville MD 20850

27apr - 27mayAll DayAmanda Agricola

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Event Details

April 27 – May 27, 2018

Gibbs Street Gallery Gallery, VisArts

Opening Reception and Artist Talk: Friday, May 4, 7 – 9 PM

Mud Dyeing Workshop with Amanda Agricola: May 19, 12-4 PM

 

Searching for buried treasure is a search for a connection to myth, the land, and self. For this exhibition, Amanda Agricola traveled to locations with treasure myths and interviewed people who have experiences digging for said treasures. What started as a quest for treasure stories quickly turned to an investigation into mankind’s tendency towards violent acquisition and demolition of land. She created CNCed maps from sections of landscapes with precious resources and painful pasts. The CNC machine traces specific areas of the map, digging into the plywood revealing hidden layers within the wood. As it delves deeper into the wood, possible blemishes and flaws are revealed as well as hidden beauty in the grains beneath the surface of the ply. She imagines a future where there is nothing left to mine; these replicas of terrains with embedded cryptocurrency mining computers are all that we have left.

Whole civilizations have been melted down to ingots and swallowed, forever lost in the belly of greed and desire. These works reflect on histories of colonization of lands caught in the crossfire of man’s thirst for power and material possession. Using dyes made from soils collected from these sites, she hand-made earth prints which serve as the palls that cover the urns of said lands, as if preparing the funerary rites of the earth. Texts, images, videos, and discoveries made along the way are embedded in the palls and earth quilts which can be discovered by the viewer in augmented reality through the use of their phone by accessing the artist’s website.

About the artist: Amanda Agricola grew up in the dirt in North Alabama, graduated with my B.A. in Studio Art from Hollins University in 2011 and received an M.F.A. from the Maryland Institute of Art (MICA) in 2015. She has shown her work locally, and regionally from Roanoke College in Roanoke, Virginia, to Maryland Art Place in Baltimore, and Panoply Gallery in Brooklyn. My work was also recently featured in the web-based New York gallery – SciArt Center.

www.amandaagricola.com

Time

April 27 (Friday) - May 27 (Sunday)

Location

VisArts

155 Gibbs Street, Rockville MD 20850

27apr - 28All DayBuilding a Sustainable Life as an ArtistFREE WORKSHOP FROM ARTISTS U/BALTIMORE

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Event Details

Based on twelve years of work with artists locally and nationally, artist leaders Ashley Minner and Andrew Simonet will offer tools for reconnecting with our deep values, building community, and making it all sustainable. We will focus on strategic planning, financial thinking, artist mission statements, and time management.

Building a Sustainable Life as an Artist
Friday, April 27, 7:00 pm -8:30 pm
Saturday, April 28, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
at  Area 405, 405 E Oliver St, Baltimore, MD 21202

How much does it cost? It’s free (but the class size is limited).
Who is it for? Practicing Baltimore artists.
Do you have to attend both sessions? Yes.
Will there be beverages? Of course. And lunch on Saturday.
How do I register? You can sign up here

What Baltimore Artists Say About the Workshop

“Our local art sphere is changing with these workshops. People are talking about things differently and feeling more empowered. The impact is deep.”
Visual artist

“I have been working full-time as a self-supporting artist for ten years, yet there was not a single idea or observation that arose today that did not make an impact on me. I have also sat through many, many strategic planning meetings, charrettes, and professional development seminars in different fields, and this by far was the most fruitful, efficient, and enjoyable. This weekend will not only make a difference in my artistic and professional life, but also in the creative life of my beloved city.”
Dance artist

“This intensive was exactly what I needed – concrete reminders that I use both sides of my brain; the guided direction to jump start my career goals that lay dormant; and defining motivation to move forward to accomplish those goals.”
Visual artist

Time

april 27 (Friday) - 28 (Saturday)

Location

Area 405

405 E. Oliver Street

27apr - 27mayAll Day50 Years Since the Assassination of MLK: An Anniversary of Uprising

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Event Details

50 Years Since the Assassination of MLK: An Anniversary of Uprising
Exhibition Opening, Friday April 27th 6pm-8pm
Work on view: April 27th-May27th

Art and Stories from

Kibibi Ajanku
Mateo Blu
Elder C. W. Harris
Geneva Johnson
George “Doc” Manning
LaToya Peoples
Ada Pinkston
S. Rasheem
Ernest Shaw
Kaleb Tshamba

This art exhibit and event pairs artists and longtime west Baltimore residents to create work surrounding the 50th anniversary of 1968, centered on the stories and lives of the five residents. The history of the assassination of MLK, of the subsequent Uprising, and of Baltimore itself, will be told through their voices and, and interpreted in many art forms by their artist pairs.

At our opening event, our artist/storyteller pairs will speak, expanding upon their process, their lives, and the stories that were most influential in the creation of this work. Closing out the evening, the Todd Marcus Quintet will perform music from their new album On These Streets which offers a musical portrait of Sandtown-Winchester and Upton and includes music reflecting on the unrest of 2015.

For more information:
Jubilee Arts
(410) 728-1199
[email protected]org

Time

April 27 (Friday) - May 27 (Sunday)

Location

Jubilee Arts Center

1947 Pennsylvania Avenue, Baltimore MD 21217

27apr6:00 pm- 8:00 pm50 Years Since the Assassination of MLK: An Anniversary of UprisingExhibition Opening

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Event Details

50 Years Since the Assassination of MLK: An Anniversary of Uprising
Exhibition Opening, Friday April 27th 6pm-8pm
Work on view: April 27th-May27th

Art and Stories from

Kibibi Ajanku
Mateo Blu
Elder C. W. Harris
Geneva Johnson
George “Doc” Manning
LaToya Peoples
Ada Pinkston
S. Rasheem
Ernest Shaw
Kaleb Tshamba

This art exhibit and event pairs artists and longtime west Baltimore residents to create work surrounding the 50th anniversary of 1968, centered on the stories and lives of the five residents. The history of the assassination of MLK, of the subsequent Uprising, and of Baltimore itself, will be told through their voices and, and interpreted in many art forms by their artist pairs.

At our opening event, our artist/storyteller pairs will speak, expanding upon their process, their lives, and the stories that were most influential in the creation of this work. Closing out the evening, the Todd Marcus Quintet will perform music from their new album On These Streets which offers a musical portrait of Sandtown-Winchester and Upton and includes music reflecting on the unrest of 2015.

For more information:
Jubilee Arts
(410) 728-1199
[email protected]org

Time

(Friday) 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Location

Jubilee Arts Center

1947 Pennsylvania Avenue, Baltimore MD 21217

27apr10:00 pmGRL PWR Presents Sweat!

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Event Details

GRL PWR Presents SWEAT! A Night of Drag 💦

The GRLz are back, we can’t stay away. We moved to a new home at Gatsby’s and ya’ll – Its so NICE. We talking MIRRORS, NEON, ICE, GLAM BABY 💎 🐩

Sounds by
Kilbourne
Hazmatcaz

Drag Performance by
Saaphyri Wildz
Bombalicious Eklaver
Tara Evans
Inferno
Viola B. Knight

Hosted by
Connie
Gorgie Morgie
Randi with an I
The Glamdroid
The Fabulous Gina D

Gatsby’s 1815 N Charles St
$10 cover, $7 in Drag
First Hour: $5 Entry Honey
21+

Bottles on Deck
Hookah in the building
Don’t forget to TIP the Drag Performers 💸

****We will be collecting donations to support Bmore’s very own local male entertainer – Inferno Sephora – and his national pageant debut. He will be competing for Mr. Gay United States 2018!!!
Learn more here:
https://www.gofundme.com/road-to-mr-gay-united-states-2018

Time

(Friday) 10:00 pm

Location

Gatsby's

1815 North Charles Street, Baltimore 21202

28apr - 5mayAll DayMoving WallsPerformances

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Event Details

Noa Heyne, Sidney Pink, Sarah Smith, Matthew Williams, and Khristian Weeks

Exhibition open April 14–May 5. Self-guided visits are free with timed entry until closing on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays from 12-6pm, and Sundays from 10-4pm. Book your visit here.

Performances Saturday April 28, 8pm; Sunday April 29, 7pm; Thursday May 3, 8pm; Saturday May 5, 8pm. Get tickets here for the dance performances.

Moving Walls is an experimental dance piece that examines human experience in relation to architecture. Combining movement with sculpture, animation, and sound, the piece is a collaborative project that questions our concepts of stability. With wheels, ropes, pulleys, hooks, and hinges, three performers construct and deconstruct the space around them. In turn, they are influenced by their shifting surroundings.

Audience members are invited to explore their own unique perspectives of Moving Walls by passing freely throughout different rooms of The Peale Center. The Peale’s rich and complex history of preservation, including former exhibitions on taxidermy and the building’s own physical restoration, provides a visual and conceptual framework for the performance.

Outside the performances, Moving Walls is open to the public as an art installation, April 14th- May 5th.

Time

April 28 (Saturday) - May 5 (Saturday)

Location

The Peale Center

225 North Holliday Street, Baltimore MD 21202

28apr - 29All DayMeet Peter Max

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MEET PETER MAX
SATURDAY  APRIL 28TH

1PM3PM  AND  6PM8PM

This unique and newly curated Collection is a never-before seen Collection of Celebrity portraiture, the Artists’ most Iconic works from six decades, and a tribute to the City of Baltimore.

All Artist appearances are complimentary and open to the public.

All artworks are on exhibition and available for acquisition.

Time

april 28 (Saturday) - 29 (Sunday)

Location

Y:ART

3402 Gough Street Baltimore, MD 21224

28apr8:00 am- 2:00 pmStation North Arts MarketplaceOpening Receptionn

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Event Details

FABULOUS FASHION SHOPPING, NEIGHBORHOOD NOSH AND LIVE PERFORMANCES WEEKLY

Longing to savor the flavor of a vibrant and exciting new arts market in the city’s hottest growing community? Then look no further than the STATION NORTH ARTS MARKETPLACE, opening Saturday, April 28, 2018, 8:00a.m. to 2:00p.m. in the Station North Arts and Entertainment District on the fenced lot at Howard and 20th Streets, just steps away from Baltimore’s iconic Graffiti Alley.

The fashion-forward marketplace, featuring designers of one-of-a-kind wearables, artwork and gallery-caliber art, novel-wares, collectibles and more will be held each Saturday and Sunday from 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Time

(Saturday) 8:00 am - 2:00 pm

28apr10:00 am- 12:00 pmKinetic Sculpture Race Volunteer Meetings

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Event Details

Volunteer for the 20th Annual Kinetic Sculpture Race!

    • Option 1: Thursday, April 19: 6:30–8:30pm OR
    • Option 2: Saturday, April 28: 10am–12pm.

(Attendance at both is not necessary.)

  • Race Day: Saturday, May 6, 2018: ALL DAY!

WANTED: the Brave, the Talented, the Mediocre, the Unsuspecting Few KINETIC VOLUNTEERS to help in the grueling, all day, general insanity of the 20th annual Kinetic Sculpture Race, for nothin’ but the glory on SATURDAY MAY 5, 2018! Enjoy refreshments while you learn about the history of AVAM’s Kinetic Sculpture Race & get the scoop from some veteran volunteers & Kinetinauts on what volunteer duties entail, then SIGN UP for a job!

In search of: General Anything Doers! Crowd Engagers! Number Nerds! Experienced Boaters! Medics on Wheels! Clean-up Crews! Safety Inspectors! Race Facilitators! Mud Pitters! Kops! Checkpoint Charlies! Canton Water Clean-up Crew! Finish Line Holders! And more!

Kinetic Rule: No matter the job, no matter the weather, you’ll still have to dress funny. No whiners!

About The Race:

From the American Visionary Art Museum—a race of wacky, imaginative, TOTALLY HUMAN-POWERED WORKS OF ART, DESIGNED TO TRAVEL ON LAND, THROUGH MUD, AND OVER DEEP HARBOR WATERS, constructed out of used bicycles, gears, and parts, created by a lunatic genius who tinkers around in the garage or backyard (do you know this person?)! The machines can be simple, small crafts, piloted by only one brave soul, or they can be over 50 feet long, extremely well-engineered, sophisticated vehicles powered by a team of pilots. Pilots (“Kinetinauts”) compete for the most coveted GRAND MEDIOCRE EAST COAST CHAMPION AWARD (finishes right in the middle), and the highly prized NEXT TO THE LAST AWARD (finishes, well, next-to-last), and other serious trophies including ART, ENGINEERING, BEST BRIBES and more. The all-day race kicks off at 11am at American Visionary Art Museum. For all official Kinetic Sculpture Race updates, visit: KineticBaltimore.com.

Questions About Volunteering?

Don’t be shy! Contact Sara Pike (410.244.1900 x216, or [email protected])

Time

(Saturday) 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Location

American Visionary Art Museum

800 Key Highway, Baltimore MD 21230

28apr2:00 pmArtist Talk: Zoë Charlton

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Event Details

Join us on Saturday, April 28 at 2pm for an Artist Talk with Zoë Charlton!

Zoë Charlton’s work is on view as part of her solo exhibition, The Domestic, in our Main Gallery, March 9th-April 28, 2018.

Black domesticity takes on layered meanings in “The Domestic”, Zoë Charlton’s first solo exhibition in Baltimore. Charlton presents a series of works on paper inspired by reoccurring imagery in her drawings: suburban houses, African masks, and southern landscapes. Domesticity-a deep familiarity with and attachment to where one lives—holds different social value depending on the body’s relationship with a place and how one belongs in it. From the privacy of a household to the publicness of national history, the domestic is interior, gendered, comforting, invisible, controlled, and integral to keeping the status quo.

Zoë Charlton creates drawings that explore the ironies of contemporary social and cultural stereotypes. She received her MFA degree from the University of Texas at Austin Her work has been included in national and international exhibitions including the Harvey B. Gantt Center, Charlotte, NC, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, AR; Studio Museum of Harlem NYC, NY; Contemporary Art Museum, Houston, TX; the Zacheta National Gallery of Art, Warsaw, Poland and Haas & Fischer Gallery, Zurich, Switzerland. She is a recipient of a Pollock-Krasner grant and Rubys grant. Charlton resides in Baltimore, MD, and is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Art at American University in Washington, DC.

Time

(Saturday) 2:00 pm

Location

School 33 Art Center

1427 Light Street, Baltimore MD 21230

28apr5:30 pmMarquee Ball 2018: The Factory

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Event Details

Mingle among the “Superstars”  at our biggest party of the year!  For one night only, The Patterson transforms into Andy Warhol’s legendary New York City Studio – The Factory!

Dance your way through two trend-setting decades with live covers of the best ‘60s-‘70s tunes on two stages,  a silent art auction, roaming performers, and wild, art-inspired costumes.

Costumes encourged! Click here for costume inspiration!

8pm-Midnight. Party Tickets: $55, $50 members. Purchase tickets here!
Tickets include beer, wine, signature cocktail and light fare.

VIP Dinner at 5:30pm. Honoring Marc Steiner with the Lifetime Acheivement Award, and Maria Broom with the Golden Formstone Award.
VIP Dinner Tickets
$250 each, table of ten $2,500. Advance tickets only. Tickets include entry to the 8pm party.
Please call our box office at 410-276-1651 to purchase dinner tickets.

Proceeds support Creative Alliance’s free Youth Education Programs.

Time

(Saturday) 5:30 pm

Location

The Creative Alliance

3134 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore MD 21224

29apr2:00 pm- 4:00 pmCuratorial Conversation with Melvin Edwards

Event Details

Join Katy Siegel, curator of the Odyssey: Jack Whitten Sculpture, 1963–2017 exhibition, in the BMA’s Meyerhoff Auditorium for a thought-provoking conversation with acclaimed sculptor Melvin Edwards on the art and legacy of Jack Whitten.

The two will reflect on Whitten’s five decades-long career of creating innovative paintings and sculptures and his impact on the trajectory of social abstraction.

This event is free and open to the public.

[IMAGE: Melvin Edwards, 2012. Courtesy Alexander Gray Associates, New York]

Time

(Sunday) 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Location

Baltimore Museum of Art

10 Art Museum Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218-3898

29apr4:00 pm- 6:00 pmWhen Living is a Protest Opening Reception + Artist Talk

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Event Details

When Living is a Protest will be presented at Goucher College’s Silber Art Gallery in the Sandy J. Unger Athenaeum from April 17 through May 25. This exhibit, which is free, open to the public, and accessible to all, can be viewed Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

ABOUT THE EXHIBIT

When Living is a Protest will feature news images by photographer, humanist, and activist Radcliffe (Ruddy) Roye ’98. In this ongoing body of work, Roye approaches protest with sophistication and emotional intelligence. A contributor for National Geographic, TIME, and The New York Times, his work has also appeared in The New Yorker, Vogue, Ebony, Fast Company, BET, and ESPN. He was named TIME Instagram photographer of 2016.

Time

(Sunday) 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Location

Silber Gallery @ Goucher College

1021 Dulaney Valley Road, Towson MD 21204

30apr6:00 pm- 8:00 pmA Conversation with Thelma Golden and Amy Sherald

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Event Details

Join us for a riveting conversation with Thelma Golden, Director and Chief Curator of the Studio Museum in Harlem and Amy Sherald, artist and BMA Trustee. Golden and Sherald will discuss Sherald’s artistic practice and this pivotal moment in her career following the unveiling of her portrait of former First Lady Michelle Obama. This event will take place in the BMA’s Meyerhoff Auditorium from 6-7 p.m., followed by a private, lite fare reception exclusively for Friends Group Members from 7-8 p.m. Seating for the conversation is first-come, first-served. Doors open at 5:30 p.m.

Time

(Monday) 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Location

Baltimore Museum of Art

10 Art Museum Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218-3898