BmoreArt’s Picks presents the best weekly art openings, events, and performances happening in Baltimore and surrounding areas. For a more comprehensive perspective, check the BmoreArt Calendar page, which includes ongoing exhibits and performances, and is updated on a daily basis.

To submit your calendar event, email us at [email protected]!

<><><><><><>

Image result for LABOR DAY GIF

GET BMOREART’S WEEKLY NEWSLETTER

We’ll send you our top stories of the week, selected event listings, and our favorite calls for entry — right to your inbox every Tuesday.

<><><><><><><><>Inna Alesina: OVERLOOKED | Opening Reception
Wednesday, August 29th • 5:30-7pm

Stevenson University
1525 Greenspring Valley Road : 21153

Biodiversity Nature Walk October 4, 2018, 12:00–2:00 PM
Bread Making October 23, 2018, 2:00–4:00 PM Registration
Lichen Jewelry Workshop November 9, 2018, 5:30–6:30 PM

Stevenson University is pleased to present OVERLOOKED, an exhibition of new work by Inna Alesina, professor of Art and Graphic Design and the School of Design’s 2018 featured faculty member. Alesina explores the ability that design has to bring our attention to nature’s usefulness in our daily lives.

Humans now recognize more brands than plants. In order to combat this trend, OVERLOOKED employs biomimicry in reverse. Instead of following the human adaptation of nature’s problem-solving abilities, the surreal nature of OVERLOOKED adopts human methods of promotion to make us care for its well-being. Branding can transform something, making it visible, valuable, and desirable. In this exhibition, Alesina reclaims promotional techniques to make our environments better, healthier, and less artificial.

Inna Alesina was born in Kharkov, Ukraine, where she studied industrial design. She continued her studies at Parsons School of Design and the Maryland Institute College of Art. Her work spans many disciplines and media, including object design, performance wear, communication design, ergonomics, food systems, and, most recently, biomaterials. Alesina adapts to new applications for design thinking. Over the years, she has worked on the design and development of products for clients in sportswear, furniture, personal care, and other industries. Alesina’s work has won numerous awards and recognition by the press, she holds dozens of patents for her inventions, and she co-authored Exploring Materials: Creative Designs for Everyday Objects with Ellen Lupton, (2010, Princeton Architectural Press). In addition to practicing design for 20 years, Alesina has been teaching design for over 15 years.

image: Inna Alesina in collaboration with Corrin Johnson and Keagen Thompson

<><><><><><><><>Pink is a Color That Feels Like Love | Opening Reception
Wednesday, August 29th • 6-8pm

Stamp Gallery
University of Maryland : College Park

In Pink is a Color That Feels Like Love, Philadelphia-based curator Katy Scarlett brings together three artists whose work is deeply invested in the formal use of color paired with recognizable motifs in order to reflect on issues of representation. The artists address stereotypes related to race, gender, sexuality, and class, figuring color imbued with broader cultural meaning as a central subject in order to critique dominant paradigms.
In his work, Brandon Dean seeks to open a dialogue around social categories and the resulting notion of “otherness” as it has been implicitly signified and defined by canonical art history. He often takes as his central focus white male subjects and includes numerous references to historical European art motifs, including the symbolic use of color, in order to question and reevaluate the mainstream boundaries of art history.
Damien Davis and Delano Dunn both examine issues around identity, cultural perceptions, and representation. The artists explore color as a formal component in their work coupled with historically racialized motifs in order to raise questions about the social implications of color, primarily related to race and stereotypes.
Thus, each artist factors color in their work in different ways that prompt us to consider: What are the social and political meanings attached to color? In what ways does color, infused with symbolic value, shape our perceptions of the world around us? In what ways does it shape our perceptions of ourselves and other communities?
ABOUT THE CURATOR: Katy Scarlett is an independent curator based in Philadelphia, PA. She is interested in how contemporary artists dissect the construction of history and memory, creating awareness around historical omission. Katy has worked in accessibility, education, and public programming at several non-profit institutions and currently works as an Adjunct Professor of Art History at the Community College of Philadelphia. She earned her Master of Fine Arts in Art History from Hunter College, City University of New York. 

<><><><><><><><>Wasted | Opening Night
Thursday, August 30th • 7:30pm

Bernard Black Box @ Baltimore Center Stage
700 North Calvert Street : 21202

Tequila, clubbing, fights, lost friends, and being sick in the toilet. Emma and Oli face the consequences of a night out. Inspired by real events, Wasted explores consensual sex and what can happen when lines, and memories, are blurred. Wasted is like no other play that you will see in Baltimore this fall—straight from New York (by way of London), and starring Will Hearle and Serena Jennings, the show packs one fateful night’s drama in an hour-long show. Award winning Irish writer and director Kat Woods presents a completely original theatrical experience that will be available to college campuses Fall 2018.

Wasted was originally performed at the Gilded Balloon at the 2015 Edinburgh Fringe, before transferring to the SoHo Playhouse in New York, as part of their Encore series. Kat Woods is critically-acclaimed for other works, Belfast Boy and Mule and a two times recipient of the Peggy Ramsey Award.

Approximate runtime is 65 minutes.
Tickets on sale now!
Thu, Aug 30 at 7:30pm
Fri, Aug 31 at 8pm
Sat, Sep 1 at 8pm

Disclaimer: This show includes language, controversial sexual situations and female nudity. Due to its sensitive subject matter, this production may trigger an adverse reaction. This show is not recommended for people aged 18 and under.

Learn More

<><><><><><><><>Flicks from the Hill | Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery
Thursday, August 30th • 9pm

American Visionary Art Museum
800 Key Highway : 21230

Free Museum Admission
5pm-9pm
Take a stroll through our current exhibition: The Great Mystery Show, as the museum is OPEN & FREE from 5pm to 9pm on Flicks nights. Then, grab a blanket and relax under the stars while you enjoy a free outdoor movie on Federal Hill Park, part of AVAM’s critically-acclaimed, free outdoor film series, Flicks from the Hill.

Fit before Flicks: Tours de Federal Hill
6:30pm-8pm

The American Visionary Art Museum (AVAM) & Race Pace Bicycles are teaming up once again for the annual Tours de Federal Hill bike rides – offered July 26 and August 30! See the local sights & scenery from the seat of your 2-wheeler on these relaxed, evening rides. On both nights, we’ll meet 6:30pm at Race Pace Bicycles (1414 Key Highway), then pedal through the historic neighborhoods & parks of Federal Hill, ending at AVAM around 8pm – just in time for you to visit the museum & catch the free Flicks from the Hill movie at 9pm!

Inclement Weather: You can check our Facebook page for updates about the location and status of the movie and any pre-screening events due to inclement weather.

<><><><><><><><>Christine Stiver: How Many Nipples Does a Horse Have?
Opening Reception Friday, August 31: 6-8

St. Charles Projects
St. Charles, 2701 N Charles Street, Baltimore MD 21218

 

<><><><><><><><>The Thing is Close // Unintended Consequences // Revealuxion| Opening Receptions
Friday, August 31th • 6-9pm

School 33 Art Center
1437 Light Street :21224

The Thing is Close (Main Gallery)

Works by Cindy Cheng and Jackie Milad

Cindy Cheng “Immure”

“The Thing is Close” exhibits the pairing of prolific Baltimore-based artists Cindy Cheng and Jackie Milad. Cheng creates complex sculptural constructions and installations that draw reference from the carefully choreographed rooms of her parents’ house in Hong Kong. Her work invokes a highly formal language to ponder the importance of objects and their ‘beneficial’ placements in the Chinese home. Gesturing toward physical spaces she has inhabited, as well as objects and things she has lived around and through, these works serve as incubators that reflect on the physical and abstract self, as well as Cheng’s own personal history and memory. Jackie Milad’s works on paper present the complexities of identity-making for people of mixed-race and ethnic backgrounds. Her work constructs a new visual language—a mash-up of actual and invented symbols associated with her Egyptian and Honduran immigrant background and family history. Combining drawing processes collaged with the cut pieces of older finished works, Milad tears away at preciousness of history to reveal another story—one that is not fixed, and yet uniquely her own.

Unintended Consequences (Members Gallery)

A solo exhibition of works by Bill Schmidt

 Bill Schmidt “Architopia”

Baltimore-based artist Bill Schmidt’s paintings are the result of his willingness to embrace and encourage the accidental—the surprising moments that occur when one strives to get paint to behave. According to Schmidt, painting can be a battle that pits the will of the painter against the will of the paint. Employing a particularly recalcitrant and unpredictable medium, traditional, water-soluble gouache, his process is one of active damage control, embracing the serendipity of favorable but unanticipated results.

Revealuxion (Project Space)

A Multi-media installation by Kieun Kim

 Kieun Kim “Revealuxion”

“Revealuxion,” a multi-media installation by Kieun Kim, utilizes mechanisms and forms inspired by butterfly chrysalides and stringed marionette hands. With this work, Kim envisions herself through the reflection of a chrysalis—a metaphor which embodies the suffering and vulnerability, as well as the patience and self-determination required for periods of intense personal growth. For the artist, the process of making and presenting “Revealuxion” to viewers is an exercise in unapologetically embracing and revealing the genuine self, forgoing the inclination to put forth inauthentic versions of ourselves to the people we encounter. The patience inherent with this work is reflected in the details, which feature kaleidoscopic projections, laser-cut acrylic, articulated wooden hands, and hundreds of yards of carefully stretched, illuminated cotton string. Kim received a Master of Fine Arts in Design and Technology at Parsons School of Design in 2015, and currently resides in Lutherville, Maryland.