BmoreArt’s Picks presents the best weekly art openings, events, and performances happening in Baltimore and surrounding areas. For a more comprehensive perspective, check the BmoreArt Calendar page, which includes ongoing exhibits and performances, and is updated on a daily basis.

To submit your calendar event, email us at events@bmoreart.com!

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Today’s GIF via Giphy by Faith Holland.

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AVAM’s July 4th: Visionary Pets On Parade!
Tuesday, July 4th : 10am

American Visionary Art Museum
800 Key Highway : 21230

Dress your pet & strut your stuff. Animal fun! Animal prizes! Trophies awarded for Best Costume, Most Patriotic, Most Visionary Pet, Owner & Pet look-alikes, Least likely to succeed as a Pet, Visionary Pet Tricks and more! Friendly pets of ALL kinds are welcome. The best dog-gone parade in town! Followed by the Pet Talent (Or Not) Show! And Sit, Stay for a rousing game of pet musical chairs! Pets must be leashed or carried. H20 and baggies provided.

REGISTRATION:

Pet Registration begins at 9:30am, Parade kicks off at 10am. This event is FREE & OPEN to the public, no advanced registration required.

<><><><><><><><>WTMD First Thursday Concert
Thursday, July 6th : 5:30 – 10pm

Canton Waterfront Park
3001 Boston Street : 21224

Robyn Hitchcock, an elder statesman of alternative rock and psych-folk whose career has spanned decades, tops a bill which also includes indie rockers Waxahatchee, the Weeks, Hollis Brown, Ron Gallo and Baltimore’s own Outcalls, at WTMD’s July First ThursdayConcert in Canton Waterfront Park.

Presented by Ron Howard and Associates of RE/MAX Preferred, WTMD’s First Thursdays has become Baltimore’s biggest free outdoor concert series. It brings together thousands of music lovers who share a love of classic artists as well as a sense of musical discovery – both of which will be on display in July.

“This line-up captures the aesthetic of WTMD’s music discovery format by putting a true alternative music pioneer, the legendary Robyn Hitchcock, on the bill with some of the buzziest indie rock artists in the country and one of Baltimore’s most innovative bands,” said Scott Mullins, WTMD’s Program Director and Station Manager.

“Waxahatchee, The Weeks, Ron Gallo, Hollis Brown and Outcalls along with Robyn Hitchcock on the waterfront with a variety of Baltimore’s best food vendors, Brewer’s Art beer and several thousand smart, curious, taste-making music fans,” he said. “Plus, it’s free. What’s not to love?”

British singer-songwriter Robyn Hitchcock emerged in the late 1970s with the band the Soft Boys, and later set out as a solo artist. He was featured in the film “Storefront Hitchcock,” directed by Jonathan Demme, and has released more than 20 albums, including his new, self-titled album, released this year.

WTMD’s First Thursdays are made possible in part by the Brewer’s Art, Cazbar & Homeslyce, Angry Orchard, Riunite Lambrusco and Baltimore City Department of Recreation & Parks.

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The 2017 Sondheim Prize Finalists by BmoreArt from Bmoreart on Vimeo.

Sondheim Finalists’ Talk (Part 1) + (Part 2)
(Part 1) Thursday, July 6th : 6:30pm + (Part 2) Saturday, July 8th : 2pm

The Walters Art Museum
600 North Charles Street : 21201

(Part 1) Hear from the finalists for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in our two-part talk series. Talks this day by finalists Mary Anne Arntzen, Cindy Cheng, and Amy Yee. The competition awards a $25,000 fellowship to assist in furthering the career of a visual artist or visual artist collaborators living and working in the Greater Baltimore region. See the exhibition, then stay for informal conversations with the artists in the Cafe.

(Part 2) Hear from the finalists for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in our two-part talk series. Talks this day by finalists Kyle Tata, Sara Dittrich, Mequitta Ahuja, and Ben Kelley. The competition awards a $25,000 fellowship to assist in furthering the career of a visual artist or visual artist collaborators living and working in the Greater Baltimore region. See the exhibition, then stay for informal conversations with the artists in the Cafe.

Presented by the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts in partnership with the Walters Art Museum.

<><><><><><><><>School 33 Art Center Presents Three New Exhibitions | Opening Receptions
Friday, July 7th : 6-9pm

School 33 Art Center
1427 Light Street : 21230

The School 33 Art Center 2017 Studio Resident Biennial Exhibition (Main Gallery): Curated by Jackie Milad, featuring work by: Amber Eve Anderson, Lynn Cazabon, Tiffany Jones, Rachel Guardiola, Sylvie Van Helden, Taha Heydari, Lauren Lyde, Tessea Antonis-Parr and Cheeny Celebrado-Royer

 Tomorrow Passed Today (Members Gallery): A Solo Exhibition of Works by Ursula Populoh

Something to be looked at, Something to be used. (Project Space): A solo exhibition by Giulia Piera Livi

School 33 Art Center Gallery Hours: Wednesday through Saturday, 11am-4pm

Location: 1427 Light Street, Baltimore, MD 21230

For more information, visit www.school33.org.

<><><><><><><><>Through the Layers Pt.1 | Opening Reception
Saturday, July 8th : 7-10pm

Terrault
218 West Saratoga Street : 21201

Join us on Saturday, July 8th from 7-10pm for the opening of Antonio McAfee’s “Through the Layers Pt. 1” solo exhibition.

Exhibition runs July 8 – July 29
Open Gallery Hours: Saturdays 1-5pm

Appropriating photographs from W.E.B Du Bois and Thomas Calloway’s Exhibition of American Negroes (1900) into various 3D images and collages, McAfee attempts to provide alternate ways to see black figures, ways that allow for the subjects to have multitudes of possibilities, real and imagined within a still image. In McAfee’s exhibition Through the Layers Pt. 1, the reimagined images provide a less static and more inexplicable depictions of the individuals, breaking down their image to reveal red and blue versions that play with the act of viewing and perception. Shifting positions while viewing the images allows the audience to view these sitters in a state that is in flux, opening up an engagement that is physical and pictorial and aims to redefine normality.

The photography series by Du Bois and Calloway was commissioned by congress and support from Historically Black Colleges and Universities in order to provide a pictorial, economic/social, and legislative survey of middle-class African Americans in Georgia, which consisted of studio portraits, Georgia black codes (laws pertaining to blacks from 1732), and charts and graphs detailing economic information and migration patterns.