George Condo: The Way I Think at The Phillips Collection by Brendan L. Smith

George Condo may not be a household name, but his artwork looks both familiar and unique.

“The only way for me to feel the difference between every other artist and me is to use every artist to become me,” Condo has said.

His work pays tribute to Picasso, Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, and Francis Bacon, but Condo has developed a signature style that explores our panoply of psychological states, ranging from humor and overt sexuality to our darker impulses mired in dark pits of fear and loathing.

While Condo is more well-known as a prolific painter, the Phillips Collection has amassed approximately 200 drawings, sketches, and sketchbooks along with some “drawing paintings” in George Condo: The Way I Think. The exhibition—on view until June 25 in The Phillips Collection—offers an expansive view of the 59-year-old artist’s work which blurs the lines between representation and abstraction. Condo embraces the grotesque and comical, reveling in a distorted carnival mirror of life where his reflections confound our expectations.

The Wedding Pianist (from sketchbook)

Condo has led a fascinating life, finding himself at the intersection of major art movements. He was a studio assistant in Andy Warhol’s factory in the 1970s, befriended fellow New York artists Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring, and moved to Paris in the 1980s. He collaborated with unhinged author William S. Burroughs in the 1990s and painted several different cover illustrations for Kanye West’s My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy album in 2010.

The final cover featured West having sex with a weird nude armless angel/phoenix/demoness adorned with white wings, feathered legs, and a polka-dotted tail. West claimed the album was banned in Wal-Mart, but that may have been the goal given his penchant for publicity stunts. Just ask Taylor Swift, Jay Z, or North when he gets a little older.

Condo pays homage to Picasso to an almost obsessive degree, and he coined the phrases “psychological cubism” and “artificial realism” to describe his own work. “Picasso painted a violin from four different perspectives at one time,” Condo said. “I do the same with psychological states.”

Double Heads Drawing

Several drawings in the exhibition, including a series called Double Heads Drawing, feature Picasso-esque portraits with faces emerging from a fractured maze of Cubist planes while uneven oversized eyes angle down toward maniacal grins. The work isn’t compelling because it looks too familiar. We know what to expect because we’ve seen it before, and while it was revolutionary in Picasso’s time, it just seems derivative now.

Condo’s work branches out more effectively into aspects of Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, and Pop Art in his own definitively weird stew. Some portraits and swirling scenes portray conflicting desires and uneasy psychological landscapes. In The Discarded Human, a beautiful nude woman’s body morphs sharply at her shoulders with a dislocated and darkened head. Only one menacing eye and two sharp rows of teeth emerge from the inky shadows. Her visage is both repulsive and attractive, combining lust, fear, and dread in a primordial soup of raw emotions.

Some of Condo’s sketches are displayed salon style from floor to ceiling, including some detailed drawings of dinosaurs inked in bright red or lime green when Condo was 7-years-old in the 1960s. In the center of another room, more than 100 sketchbooks are stacked in rows under glass, creating a sense of mystery about their contents. Only a few are opened to reveal pages inside. One note dated Aug. 27 with no year includes just one cryptic sentence: “I feel better than I have ever felt in my life.”

A 2009 graphite and colored pencil drawing titled Study for the Fallen Butler is a fascinating example of how a painting can transcend its conception. The drawing shows a debauched scene with a drunk tuxedoed butler slumped on the floor while raising his champagne glass toward the nude bottom of a woman bending over in a French maid costume. Drawn curtains behind them reveal a painting of rolling green hills beneath a cloudy sky. The setting may be a stately home while the master is away or the stage of a bawdy theatrical production, but the artifice is real, as Condo would say.

It’s difficult to compare the study for The Fallen Butler to the grand painting that followed because they aren’t located near each other in the exhibition. They aren’t even on the same floor in The Phillips Collection. Two rooms of Condo’s drawings and sketches are effectively displayed on the ground floor, but visitors then must consult a map, climb a flight of stairs, and walk past other exhibitions to find six of Condo’s large paintings shoehorned into a small claustrophobic room next to the restrooms. The inclusion of the paintings seems like an afterthought in the bifurcated exhibition or a strange curatorial decision to downplay the paintings because the exhibition’s theme focuses on Condo’s drawings.


The Fallen Butler

The Fallen Butler is worth seeing despite the location. The painting, on loan from the Museum of Modern Art, bears only a passing resemblance to the study as it transforms from a comical over-the-top scene toward a more vivid, subtle abstraction. The butler, or part of him, is still visible hoisting a large green bottle, but most of the maid has disappeared into the jumbled background except for a disjointed head with glaring eyes perched atop an elongated neck. Other small floating faces peek out from a patchwork quilt of colors that threatens to overwhelm the main characters. While the title references only the butler, the painting is an ensemble performance.

Another highlight is Spanish Head Composition which combines elements of painting, drawing and collage. A central figure has a scribbled Picasso-esque face on a painted body with a wide-brimmed hat and a swirling shirt with a clownish collar. He is surrounded by small portraits on paper that have been affixed to the canvas. The drawings vary in style and complexity, ranging the gamut from more representational to abstract. Some of the portraits appear to be studies for the large central figure, and the inclusion of the preparatory drawings in the final work offers a fascinating time line or view of roads not taken.


Spanish Head Composition

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Brendan L. Smith is a freelance journalist and mixed-media artist in Washington, D.C.

George Condo: The Way I Think will be on view at The Phillips Collection through June 25.  

january, 2020

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17jan - 26All DaySIMAETHA: a Dreambaby Cabaret

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SIMAETHA (pronounced sigh-mee-thuh) is an experimental witch cabaret written and performed by Jacob Budenz (a.k.a. Dreambaby), featuring dance and performance by Alexander D’Agostino. Through poetry, storytelling, music, and ritual, the show weaves together real and conjured memories, using mythology to rewrite identity. Simaetha, the angry witch in Idyll 2 by the Ancient Greek poet Theocritus, becomes the inspiration for an ageless, genderless creature navigating the seductive and double-edged gifts of demons, family ghosts, lovers, legends, and lonely yearnings of immortality. At once meditative, surreal, and darkly funny, SIMAETHA: a Dreambaby Cabaret explores myths invented and reimagined through theatrical vignettes, tied together by haunting songs in Dreambaby’s signature witch cabaret style, raw dance performances by Alex D’Agostino, and various rituals that implicate the audience in the story.

 

The show runs approximately 75 minutes from Friday-Sunday, January 17th-26th, 2020 at The Carroll Mansion, located on 800 E Lombard St, Baltimore, MD 21202. All shows are at 8 PM, except January 19th, which will be a 2:30 PM matinee.

 

ABOUT THE ARTISTS:

JACOB BUDENZ is a queer writer, multi-disciplinary performer, and educator with a BA from Johns Hopkins University and an MFA from University of New Orleans. The author of PASTEL WITCHERIES (Seven Kitchens Press 2018), Jacob has recent and forthcoming work in Slipstream, Pussy Magic, Mad Scientist Journals, Lycan Valley Press, and Mason Jar Press. A theater artist in Baltimore since 2010, Budenz has performed in and directed numerous productions, including writing and directing an original adaptation of Bulgakov’s THE MASTER AND MARGARITA that appeared in Baltimore City Paper’s Top Ten Staged Productions of 2016, as well as a recent position as the composer and music director for MICA’s spring production, AT THE WATER’S EDGE. By reviewers in the Baltimore Sun and DC Metro Theater Arts, Budenz’s performances have been referred to as “angelic” and “truly grotesque,” respectively.

 

ALEXANDER D’AGOSTINO is a performance artist, teacher, and arts organizer based in Baltimore, Maryland. He graduated from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2009 with a BFA in painting. He investigates the queer and otherworldly through dance, ritual, teaching, installation and performance art.

 

This project is funded by the William G. Baker, Jr. Memorial Fund, creator of the Baker Artist Portfolios, www.BakerArtist.org. In 2017, SIMAETHA: a Dreambaby Cabaret played on a shoestring budget as a “pilot” performance in the attic of the Psychic/Annex space on Park Avenue. After ample workshopping and skillbuilding, the show emerges as something new and better than ever thanks to the generous contribution of the Baker Fund.

Time

january 17 (Friday) - 26 (Sunday)

Location

Carroll Mansion

800 East Lombard Street, Baltimore 21202

23jan6:00 pm- 8:00 pmChul Hyun Ahn: Light/ContinuumOpening Reception

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C. Grimaldis Gallery is pleased to present Light/Continuum, a solo exhibition of works by Korean artist Chul Hyun Ahn.  As an investigation of infinite space, Ahn uses light, color, and illusion to immerse his viewers in deep landscapes that bridge the gap between the conscious and subconscious.

 

Chul Hyun Ahn constructs illusionistic environments, providing a space for contemplation. His sculptures urge the viewer to consider man’s boundless ability for physical and spiritual travel while exploiting notions of infinity and the poetics of emptiness.  Ahn has translated geometric painting and the Zen practice of meditation into an art of light, space, and technology, enticing the viewer to look deeply into his frame of environments. His works create an optical and bodily illusion of infinity through apparent limitless space. The notion of the void distinguishes his work amid the vast panoply of ways that artists have used light as a medium since the experiments of the 1920s and particularly since the 1960s.

 

 
 
“There are no clear answers to what lies beyond the physical limitations of our world. This is the crux of the work – the audience must bring themselves to the threshold and confront the infinite space to complete the work.”
Chul Hyun Ahn is an artist of international acclaim, with works in numerous public and private collections including the Margulies Collection at the Warehouse, the Hearst Foundation, Movado Group, the Jordan D. Schnitzer Family Foundation, Delaware Art Museum, Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art and the Palm Springs Art Museum. Ahn participated in Art Basel Hong Kong 2019 in collaboration with La Prairie, Switzerland. He lives and works in Baltimore, Maryland and has been represented by C. Grimaldis Gallery since 2002. 
 
Chul Hyun Ahn: Light /Continuum will be on view from January 23 through February 29, 2020. An opening reception will take place on Thursday, January 23, 6 – 8 pm. Hours for C. Grimaldis Gallery, which is free and open to the public, are Tuesday through Saturday, 10:30 am – 5:30 pm.

IMAGES:

“Quarter Infinity”, 2011, cast acrylic, LED lights, mirrors, hardware, 72 x 72 x 72 inches
“Emptiness”, 2002, Edition of 3 + 1 AP, plywood, fluorescent lights, mirrors, 27 x 96 x 8 inches
“Railroad (Curve to the Left)”, 2018, Edition of 3 + 1 AP, plywood, mirrors, resin, stone, LED lights, hardware, 94 x 94 x 20 inches

Time

(Thursday) 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Location

C. Grimaldis Gallery

523 North Charles Street Baltimore MD 21201

23jan6:00 pm- 8:00 pmBarbers and Porters: Pillars of Community – Schroeder CherryOpening Reception

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One of Baltimore’s best kept secrets is artist, Schroeder Cherry.  With his 2019 Artscape Sondheim Finalist status, Cherry quickly became a fan favorite.  Now, after years of producing an extraordinary multi-discipline body of art, Cherry is poised to step beyond his unsung artist status with his solo exhibition, Barbers and Porters: Pillars of Community at The Gallery in Baltimore City Hall.  Opening on January 23rd and on view until February 28th, Barbers and Porters presents Cherry’s newest series, the Barber Shop, and glances from his poignant Porters series.

The Barber Shop Series is inspired by those safe places where African Americans gather for culture, grooming, community, entrepreneurship, debate, politics, and perspectives on every day events.  After the Civil War, Chicago businessman George M. Pullman hired thousands of African-American men, many former enslaved, to serve white passengers traveling across the country on his luxury railroad sleeping cars.  While they were underpaid, overworked, and endured constant racism on the job, the porters would eventually fuel the Great Migration, shape a new black middle class, and ultimately launch the civil rights movement.  This is the inspiration for Dr. Cherry’s Porter Series.

A native of Washington, DC, Cherry began making art and playing with puppets in his youth.  Cherry earned a Bachelor of Arts in Painting and Puppetry from the University of Michigan, a Master’s degree in Museum Education from The George Washington University, and a Doctorate in Museum Education from Columbia University.  Cherry’s works are informed by a broad sweep of narratives, literature, mythology, music, current events, and steep in United States history.  Although his preferred medium is acrylic with found objects on wood, audiences will find familiar items such as keys and locks, as well as cultural identifiers like cowrie shells in his creations.

 

“My art works are open-ended narratives inspired by travel, music, literature, folklore, and everyday events.  Mixed-media assemblage paintings on wood often incorporate discarded objects.  Keys and locks represent tools of access.  Glass shards, metal, buttons, playing cards—all become part of the materials telling a story.  The works are open ended because there is no one story; viewers bring their own experiences to each piece.”

 

Currently, Dr. Cherry teaches Museum Studies at Morgan State University.  He has held museums positions at The Art Institute of Chicago, the Smithsonian Institution’s Anacostia Museum, Studio Museum in Harlem, the J. Paul Getty Museum in California, Baltimore Museum of Art, and the Maryland Historical Society.  His artwork has been exhibited at MAXgallery, Hamilton Arts Collective, Fleckenstein Gallery, Maryland Art Place, RESORT, The Peale Center, and the Watergate Gallery.

Cherry’s series present significant African American and American history through art.  His Porters Series is rivaled only by artist, Jacob Lawrence’s, The Great Migration series.  Schroeder Cherry’s Barbers and Porters: Pillars of Community, will be on view at The Gallery in Baltimore City Hall from January 23, 2020 through Black History Month, February 28, 2020.

Time

(Thursday) 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Location

The Gallery in Baltimore City Hall

100 Holliday Street, Baltimore 21202

24jan8:00 pmWendel Patrick Quartet & Brandon Woody Upendo

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Deep musical power from two of Baltimore’s sonic visionaries.

 

About Wendel:

Wendel Patrick has been referred to as “David Foster Wallace reincarnated as a sound engineer” by Urbanite Magazine and as “wildly talented” by the Baltimore Sun. He has been referred to by XLR8R magazine as “a hip-hop producer that could easily make any fan of Squarepusher, Boards of Canada, or Madlib flip out.” The alter-ego of classical and jazz pianist Kevin Gift, Wendel Patrick is rapidly making a name for himself as a producer to be recognized.  In the February 2018 issue of Baltimore Magazine, Wendel Patrick was named one of 30 Baltimore Visionaries and labeled as “one of the most influential and omnipresent figures in the local arts scene”. His five albums, Sound:, Forthcoming, JDWP, Passage, and Travel were all produced without the use of sampling, with Patrick playing every note of every instrument. What is perhaps most astounding and perplexing to listeners is that there are actually no instruments…he crafts all of the instruments, and every note, electronically.

Equally at home performing on stage with his band, behind two turntables, beatboxing, improvising, or playing a Mozart Concerto on stage with orchestra, Wendel Patrick has toured Europe on several occasions and performed throughout the world with renowned spoken word artist and poet Ursula Rucker. Wendel Patrick’s music has also been heard across the country on NPR stations, most notably on Out of the Blocks, the national Edward R. Murrow award winning radio documentary program he co-produces with radio producer Aaron Henkin for NPR affiliate WYPR that has been featured by the Third Coast International Audio Festival and Hearing Voices as well as on the BBC. An avid photographer and videographer, his photography has been exhibited in several art galleries including the Baltimore Museum of Art. Patrick shoots all of the accompanying documentary photography and videography for “Out of the Blocks “.

 

About Brandon:

Way back in 2015, the Baltimore Sun named Brandon Woody a musician on the rise. Since then, Brandon has refined and defined his own sound -a blistering and soulful jazz direction powered by his masterful trumpet playing. Live, audiences can hear influences from Miles Davis to contemporary hip hop in the music of his band Brandon Woody Upendo,

Woody is an alumni of the Baltimore School for the Arts and attended the Brubeck Institute and the Manhattan School of Music. He has studied with Cecile Bridgewater, Ambrose Akinmusire and Theljon Allen. He has performed with masters such as Quincy Phillips, Ray Angry, Benny Maupin, Stefon Harris, Danilo Perez, Terri-Lyne Carrington, Steve Wilson, John Pattituci, Ed Simon, Tarus Mateen

In addition to his jazz playing and recording, he has been called on to record with hip hop artist Miranda Curtis, Sophie Marks, Solange, Neptune, Victoria Canal.  He is a new member of Solange’s band and Standing on the Corner.

At a moment when so many young, talented jazz players are moving to New York, Chicago, and LA, Brandon is back in Baltimore infusing the highly talented scene with his energy, style, and skill.

FRI JAN 24 | 8PM | $18, $15 MEMBERS (+$3 over the phone, online, or at the door)

Time

(Friday) 8:00 pm

Location

The Creative Alliance

3134 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore MD 21224

25jan1:00 pm- 2:30 pmCreating Black Comic Books (C.B.C.B.) Workshop (Ages 11-17)

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Calling all young comic artists! This workshop is designed to teach the necessary skills to emerging artists. Learn how to enhance your drawing skills, tips for self-publishing, and how to best present yourself as a professional in the expanding comic book industry.

Click here for tickets.
Members
: $6; Non-members: $8

Time

(Saturday) 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Location

Reginald F. Lewis Museum

830 East Pratt Street, Baltimore MD 21202

25jan2:00 pm- 4:00 pmEternal SplendorArtist's Talk

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Solo Exhibition featuring Larry Cook
November 9, 2019 – January 25, 2020

 

In “Cool Pose: The Dilemmas of Black Manhood” Richard Majors and Janet Mancini Billson describe the posing and posturing of black men as a tool “to communicate power, toughness, detachment, and style-self – a carefully crafted persona that is key to the negotiation of black urban environments.” I am interested in how photography encapsulates this persona—specifically within prison and club photography aesthetics. Posing for the camera provides an outlet in which the subject can reclaim agency.

Eternal Splendor explores the cultural aesthetic of “club” and prison photography to examine how urban culture and incarceration systems become entwined through backdrops. The backdrop is central for its relationship to the formal, social, and cultural aspects of photographic history. My work includes found polaroids of subjects posing in front of backdrops to focus on elements of performance, expression, and spectacle. I employ elements of pictorial realism and fantasy to examine the broader questions of status, individualism, and materialism within black culture.
Larry Cook, 2019

The Visiting Room Series, Digital Print, 40×30 inches, 2019

Time

(Saturday) 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Location

Galerie Myrtis

2224 North Charles Street, Baltimore MD 21218

25jan4:00 pm- 7:00 pmLola Flash Now: 40 Years After MICA

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Event Details

Lola Flash uses photography to challenge stereotypes and offer new ways of seeing that transcend and interrogate gender, sexual, and racial norms. Since graduating from the Maryland Institute College of Art forty years ago, she has established herself as an international artist. Lola’s work is included in important public collections such as the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the Brooklyn Museum. In 2018 Lola and her amazing photography were featured in an article in The New York Times (Link in gallery website). Her most recent solo show took place, in London in 2019, at Autograph Gallery. Lola is also a member of the long-standing Kamoinge Photo Collective in Harlem. Her projects are an insiders’ account of the many ways black and gay people are perceived and how selected images have affected our psyche. She identifies as black and gay and for 40 years Lola has been committed to deconstructing racism, sexism and homophobia through challenging photographic imagery.

Gallery Blue Door is very excited for this powerful exhibit and pleased to have this exhibit coordinate with Lola’s talk at MICA on Feb. 21st with Dr. Leslie King Hammond. (Details in the gallery website)

Time

(Saturday) 4:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Location

Gallery Blue Door

833 Park Avenue, Baltimore 21201

25jan5:00 pm- 8:00 pmCONSTRUCTEDReception with Artists

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Event Details

Full Circle is pleased to present CONSTRUCTED, a group exhibition of five artists showcasing work inspired by architecture and the built environment.

Architecture functions beyond a basic need for shelter and frequently reflects our own personal and collective identities. But these cultural associations and meanings are open to interpretation and change over time. In fact, as these five artists demonstrate, they are easily manipulated to become parts of artistic expression and thus whole new cultural statements.

Featuring photography, collage, assemblage, sculpture, and sound, CONSTRUCTED presents five artists: Graham Coreil-Allen, ​Khánh H. Lê, Mark Luthringer, D.S. Mangus, and James Singewald. These artists use photography and photographic work to celebrate and question our surroundings and their constructed meanings. All of the work in the exhibition are devoid of people but their presence is implied and captured not only through sound and research but also by the monuments of our own psyche.

The photographs by Graham Coreil-Allen document the ongoing Druid Hill Park restoration project and its ramifications for the local community. While the project to comply with the EPA’s 2006 Safe Drink Water Act is ultimately expected to benefit the city and the health of its residents, construction has significantly disrupted pedestrian access to the park. Coreil-Allen explores the question of how projects undertaken to advance collective goals affect individual residents. Accompanying his photographs is a “growing” sculpture made from found objects he picked up on his walks between his residence in Druid Hill and the gallery.

Khánh H. Lê’s work probes his personal and family histories as a way of carving out a cultural identity for himself as a Vietnamese-born American artist. His piece in the show, a photo-sculpture of a city block paired with audio interviews of local residents, seeks to create a historical narrative reflecting the tensions found not only in his own identity, but in many other communities as well. Lê’s interviews of residents demonstrate that places and spaces can be fashioned in our image, remodeled for anyone, and that place does not have to dictate culture.

Mark Luthringer’s mall rooflines uses an iterative approach to assemble a group of images that, when viewed as a grid, comment on the repetition, redundancy, and excess of our current age. These architectural gestures intended to create distinguishing features for shopping malls instead seem to demonstrate the futility of pursuing this goal, and of the limits of using architecture to forcibly manufacture a universal ‘culture.’

Photographer and writer D.S. Mangus presents photomontages in both 2D and 3D forms. Built from found objects, layered photos, and collaged digital fragments of construction and demolition sites, Mangus explores the parallels between architecture and his experience within his own body. Set in Boston and Baltimore, the images display both the life cycle of buildings and our own.

James Singewald uses saturated film images to perform a building by building survey of blocks in Baltimore. Combining them with research, he seeks to attach stories and history to each facade he photographs. While these pictures are void of people, their implied presence is captured by preserving and archiving the voices of the past.

Architecture is such a ubiquitous presence in our lives that we do not give much thought to how it affects us, what we need from it, and what it can mean to us. CONSTRUCTED presents 5 artists offering responses to these questions and also demonstrates the power of change that we all possess. Our spaces are passed down to us and while the memory should be preserved, age does not equate with correctness and universality.

Exhibition dates: January 11th – February 29th.

Reception w/ Artists: January 25th, 5-8PM.

 

Time

(Saturday) 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Location

Full Circle Gallery

33 East 21st Street, Baltimore MD 21218

25jan6:00 pm- 8:00 pmOn the Verge: 25 New and Emerging Artists

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Event Details

On view: JAN 25 – FEB 22

Reception: SAT JAN 25 | 6-8PM

The artists represented in On the Verge: 25 New and Emerging Artists embrace the rich diversity of the artistic community in both background and style. Discover works that range in style, media, and material created by artists from across the globe. Local talent representing Baltimore and Washington share the space with global up-and-comers from Japan and Pakistan. Each piece invites you to experience the artist’s culture, history, or personal story in a unique way.

Creative Alliance is proud to support these artists on their professional journey by providing a space within which they might push their visions, take artistic risks, and experiment in their storytelling. Celebrate our 25th year with 25 artists!

ARTISTS INCLUDED:

Jack Coyle

Walter Cruz

Sara Dittrich

Italo Duarte

Nicole Dyer

Alexandre Edoh Yao Amegah

Erin Fitzpatrick

Andrew Flanders

Kayla Fryer

Carrie Fucile

Jerrell Gibbs

Alexis Gomez

Taha Heydari

Jani Hileman

Kei Ito

Megan Koeppel

Amani Lewis

Charles Mason III

James “Alpha” Massaquoi

Murjoni Merriweather

Jason Patterson

J. Alex Schechter

Sul-Jee Scully

You Wu

Kyle Yearwood

Time

(Saturday) 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Location

The Creative Alliance

3134 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore MD 21224

25jan6:00 pm- 9:00 pmPast, Present, and FutureOpening Reception

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As Baltimore Clayworks celebrates its auspicious anniversary of 40 years of clay, community and creativity, its exhibitions will reflect all facets of their history and upcoming endeavors. In January, the year-long celebration will kick off with Past, Present, and Future, an exhibition of many of the artists who have been involved with Clayworks over the years. This includes Founding, Associate, Fellowship, and Resident Artists, along with Studio Interns, who have helped the organization grow. The exhibition will be on display from Jan. 11 – Feb. 22, with an opening reception on Jan. 11 from 6-9pm that is free and open to the public. The reception will feature food, drinks, music, and two esteemed speakers: Ralph E. Moore Jr., Co-founder and Chief Fundraiser for Peace Camp 2020, and Ken Skrzesz, Executive Director of the Maryland State Arts Council.

 

Baltimore Clayworks has earned a national and international reputation for artistic excellence, artists’ support, and community involvement. This 40thanniversary year celebrates the organization’s rich history, reputation, and community. Clayworks will have many fun activities throughout the year to highlight the joy in its mission, and passion for the arts and Baltimore. Follow Baltimore Clayworks on social media and their website for the latest news about upcoming celebratory events. Clayworks is proud to be Fired Up at Forty!

Time

(Saturday) 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Location

Baltimore Clayworks

5707 Smith Avenue, Baltimore MD 21209

26jan11:00 am- 4:00 pmLunar New Year Celebration

Event Details

Celebrate the Year of the Rat during our 11th-annual Lunar New Year Celebration, one of the Walters’ most popular events. Enjoy performances by the Baltimore Chinese School, Johns Hopkins Lion Dance Troupe, and more. Make paper flowers to add to our giant floral rat sculpture, explore zodiac animals through a scavenger hunt in the Arts of Asia galleries, participate in art-making activities, snap your picture in a photo booth, and share a fortune for good luck in the New Year!

Time

(Sunday) 11:00 am - 4:00 pm

Location

The Walters Art Museum

600 North Charles Street, Baltimore MD 21201

30jan5:30 pm- 7:30 pmNinth Biennial Faculty Art ExhibitionArtists' Reception

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Event Details

The “Ninth Biennial Faculty Art Exhibition” at McDaniel College highlights a variety of works by current art and art history faculty members. The exhibition runs Thursday, Jan. 30–Friday, Feb. 28, in McDaniel’s Rice Gallery, Peterson Hall, at 2 College Hill, Westminster, Md. An artists’ reception takes place Thursday, Jan. 30, 5:30-7:30 p.m., with a gallery talk at 6 p.m.

 

This exhibition is a rare opportunity to see the range and depth of works by select McDaniel faculty members.

 

Works in the exhibition include paintings by professor Steven Pearson, Chinese-styled watercolor and ink paintings by professor Susan Clare Scott and intermedia and digital art by assistant professor Chloe Irla.

 

For example, in Pearson’s Duralar drawings, he communicates a unique message using pieces of his past works.

 

“I combine fragments of my representational paintings created between 1995-2003, nonrepresentational renderings produced between 2003-2014, and current articles from various newspapers,” Pearson said. “The final renditions of fragmented and layered histories enact the ways that we collectively experience multiple temporalities in the present.  Quoting my various bodies of work challenges both material and conceptual boundaries that determine fixed notions of artistic identity.”

 

Other works by adjunct lecturers include photography by Walter Calahan, jewelry by Linda Van Hart, images and wall sculpture by Chinen Aimi, pottery and ceramics by Nicole Diem and mixed media by Nicole Ringel.

 

The exhibition and reception are both free and open to the public. Rice Gallery hours are Monday–Friday from noon–4 p.m. and Saturday, noon–5 p.m. Call 410-857-2595 for more information. Visit www.mcdaniel.edu for information about McDaniel College.

Time

(Thursday) 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Location

McDaniel College

2 College Hill, Westminster MD 21157

30jan6:30 pmStacy Levy: Collected WatershedLecture + Opening Reception

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Event Details

TU Department of Art + Design, Art History, Art Education

Lecture | Environmental Artist Stacy Levy 

Thurs., Jan. 30, 6:30 p.m.

From rivers to runoff, the nationally renowned environmental sculptor Stacy Levy has explored the many facets of water. Here she considers the interconnectedness of the Chesapeake Watershed. Levy received a BA from Yale University and an MFA from the Tyler School of Art at Temple University.

Center for the Arts, Art Lecture Hall, CA 2032

Free


TU Department of Art + Design, Art History, Art Education

Exhibition | Stacy Levy: Collected Watershed 

Fri., Jan. 31 – Sat., Apr. 25 (Closed Mar. 15 – 22)

Gallery Hours: Tues. – Sat., 11 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Opening Reception: Thurs., Jan. 30, following lecture

This lyrical installation by nationally renowned environmental artist Stacy Levy will make visual the interconnectedness of local watersheds, mapping them onto the floor of the gallery by filling thousands of recycled glass jars with water from the corresponding streams and tributaries. (Galleries Closed Mar. 15-22) 

Center for the Arts Gallery, CA 3040

 

 

Time

(Thursday) 6:30 pm

Location

Towson University Center for the Arts

Center for the Arts, Towson University, Towson 21252

30jan6:30 pmItalo De Dea: Limits of EmpathyOpening Reception

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Event Details

TU Department of Art + Design, Art History, Art Education

MFA Exhibition | Italo De Dea: Limits of Empathy

Fri., Jan. 31 – Sat., Apr. 18 (Closed Mar. 15 – 22)

Gallery Hours: Tues. – Sat., 11 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Opening Reception: Thurs., Jan. 30 following 6:30 p.m. lecture

De Dea composes warm, monochromatic ink drawing installations of landscapes, urban areas, fauna, flora and figures, contrasting the socioeconomics of the northern and southeastern regions of Brazil from historic books, utilizing various media and field research to create an open narrative.

Center for the Arts, Holtzman MFA Gallery, CA 2040

Free

 

Time

(Thursday) 6:30 pm

Location

Towson University Holzman MFA Gallery

8000 York Road, Towson MD

30jan6:30 pmRachel Horner: EntanglementOpening Reception

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Event Details

TU Department of Art + Design, Art History, Art Education

MFA Exhibition | Rachel Horner: Entanglement

Fri., Jan. 31 – Sat., Apr. 18 (Closed Mar. 15 – 22) Gallery Hours: Tues. – Sat., 11 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Opening Reception: Thurs., Jan. 30 following 6:30 p.m. lecture

Horner explores the interconnection and complexity of our climate crisis, employing saturated hues and abstracted imagery to investigate nature’s immense resilience and simultaneous fragility. Entanglement conveys the delicate entanglement we share with the flora and fauna of our biosphere.

Center for the Arts, Holtzman MFA Gallery, CA 2040

Free

 

Time

(Thursday) 6:30 pm

Location

Towson University Holtzman MFA Gallery

8000 York Road, Towson MD

30jan6:30 pmEdelweiss Calcagno: Y?Opening Reception

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Event Details

TU Department of Art + Design, Art History, Art Education

MFA Exhibition | Edelweiss Calcagno: Y?

Fri., Jan. 31 – Sat., Apr. 18 (Closed Mar. 15 – 22)

Gallery Hours: Tues. – Sat., 11 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Opening Reception: Thurs., Jan. 30 following 6:30 p.m. lecture

Calcagno explores abstraction through a variety of media to shed light on abuse survivors. Multiple perspectives and layering represent the changes in those who experience abuse, ADHD, PTSD, dyslexia and other disabilities that are a normal consequence of trauma.

Center for the Arts, Holtzman MFA Gallery, CA 2040

Free

 

Time

(Thursday) 6:30 pm

Location

Towson University Holtzman MFA Gallery

8000 York Road, Towson MD

30jan7:00 pm- 10:00 pmClaire Rudy Foster presents "Shine of the Ever: Short Stories"

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Event Details

Shine of the Ever is a literary mix tape of queer voices out of 1990s Portland. By turns tender and punk-tough, fierce and loving, this collection of short stories explores what binds a community of queer and trans people as they negotiate love, screwing up and learning to forgive themselves for being young and sometimes foolish.

Claire Rudy Foster is a queer, nonbinary single parent in recovery. Their short story collection, I’ve Never Done This Before, was published to warm acclaim in 2016. With four Pushcart Prize nominations, Claire’s writing has appeared in McSweeney’s, The Rumpus, and many other journals. Their nonfiction work has reached millions of readers in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and Narratively, among others. Claire lives and writes in Portland, Oregon.

Time

(Thursday) 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Location

Red Emma's

1225 Cathedral St, Baltimore, MD 21201

31jan5:00 pm- 9:00 pmCatch Release ActivateOpening Reception

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Event Details

Catch, Release, Activate is an exhibition that highlights the artists’ work both in the moment and dialogue. Catch and Release is a turn of phrase that the curator, Joy Davis, applies to the process of creating and exhibiting art. What makes this exhibition different than the typical “catch and release” style of exhibition is that the artists Jamie Grace Alexander, Walter Cruz, and Bobbi Rush want their art to live and move beyond the creative process and as art objects.

The gallery will be open 5-9PM
Shorty’s BBQ will be offering scrumptious eats for $10 5-8PM
DJ Black Planet will create vibes 7-9PM

Artist Bios
Jamie Grace Alexander is known through her work as Proxy. Proxy is defined as “the authority to represent someone else” & her work considers the distance between the artist herself & the many communities she belongs to. She found graffiti as a medium to oppose trans exclusive messages in women’s bathrooms across Baltimore city in 2018. Her tag allows her to be present through the curled lips, noses, & hair of her proxies. In this series, she brings her practice indoors, turning mirrors into altars & marking both as sites of self-reflection. Her work on these mirrors can shield, tuck, & adjust light, asking questions about lineage, futurity, & belonging. She sees internal discovery as a key strength of her identities & encourages viewers to look for themselves in her work.
Hailing from Washington Heights and The Bronx, Walter Cruz is a creative collaborator exploring the intersections of art, design and architecture to better understand how Black and brown bodies activate and take up space. Cruz has completed residencies and fellowships with The Laundromat Project, NurtureArt Gallery(Brooklyn,NY) amongst others. As well shown work in galleries and museums including The Museum of the City of New York, the Center for Political Graphics in Los Angeles, Syracuse University and Longwood Gallery in The Bronx. Most of all, Walter is dedicated to learning from and being with the people. Cruz serves as the graphic designer for the Black Alliance for Just Immigration(BAJI), he is currently part of the creative collective Axel NYC, which creates interactive art installations nationally and the creative director and co-founder for Zeal; a Black worker-owned company that focuses on creating spaces for Black multidisciplinary artists to thrive. Walter is an MFA candidate at the Maryland Institute College of Art’s Mount Royal School of Art. Ultimately, in a world that is constantly telling Black and brown folks not to be themselves, Cruz’s goal is to create work that inspires and informs those very people.
Bobbi Rush is a multidisciplinary artist from Baltimore, Maryland. She began her work at the age of six. Growing, she traveled with various performing artists as a background
vocalist. Moving forward in her solo space, she’s shared her voice and worked with many touring acts. Bobbi has self-published two books. Her first, “Words (Feeling…Feelings)” which shares the thought of loss, encouragement, and growth. Her second, “PUSSY”, which is a more vocal, understood sense of self through writing. Bobbi is creator and lead of TheBlueFaceProject, a home base for her expanding forms of art expression. Through voice, jewelry design, film, song, and writing, Bobbi’s mission is to simply keep creating.

Time

(Friday) 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Location

Waller Gallery

2420 Calvert Street, Baltimore MD 21218