David Page

Sculpture at Evergreen 6: Simultaneous Presence
May 2, 2010 – September 26, 2010
Guest curators: Jennie Fleming and Ronit Eisenbach
Location: Evergreen Museum & Library
Exhibition is free and on view throughout the museum grounds, Tuesday – Sunday, 9am – 5pm. (Gates locked promptly at 5pm)

Ten thought-provoking installations of temporary, large-scale, site-specific artwork have been created for the 26-acre grounds of Johns Hopkins’ Evergreen Museum & Library as part of the exhibition Sculpture at Evergreen 6: Simultaneous Presence, opening with a public reception from 1 to 4 p.m. on Sunday, May 2.

Developed by individuals and teams of artists and architects from across the country, the interventions respond to Evergreen’s 150-year history, diverse collections, and natural and architectural environments, and connect them to current civic, national and global concerns.

The exhibition features new work by Yolande Daniels (New York, NY); Myeongbeom Kim (Chicago, IL); Joel Lamere + Cynthia Gunadi (Boston, MA); Eric Leshinsky, C. Ryan Patterson & Fred Scharmen (Baltimore, MD); Matter Practice (Brooklyn, NY); Yukiko Nakashima (Astoria, NY); Meredith Nickie (New York, NY); Taeg Nishimoto (San Antonio, TX); David Page (Baltimore, MD); and Shannon Young (Baltimore, MD).

Yolande Daniels
“Simultaneous Presence is an embedded conversation on the intertwining of moments, meanings and place,” says Ronit Eisenbach, one of the show’s two guest curators. Eisenbach is an associate professor of architecture and chair of the Kibel Gallery at the University of Maryland School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation.

Jennie Fleming, the other curator, is a Maryland-based artist, curator, educator and cultural historian who is currently working on her doctorate in the Media, Art and Text program at Virginia Commonwealth University. “The works invite reflection on convergent and contrasting interpretations of abundance and absence, sustenance and sustainability, fantasy and pleasure, wealth and its source, and the contrasting realities of Baltimore,” she says.

Alice Warder Garrett, who lived at Evergreen from 1920 to 1952, welcomed artists, performers and scholars to Evergreen to draw inspiration from the property’s rich historic collection and impressive setting. Today, Evergreen Museum & Library’s biennial Sculpture at Evergreen exhibition series, which began in 2000, continues this legacy by inviting artists to draw inspiration from Evergreen to create and showcase new works of temporary sculpture. In this sense, the museum’s historic collection becomes a vibrant, creative source for new works and artistic innovations.

Sculpture at Evergreen 6 continues through Sept. 26. Hours of the exhibition, which is free and open to the public, are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and noon to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday (gates locked promptly). Walking maps and a free illustrated visitor’s guide (attached as PDF) are available in the Evergreen Museum & Library shop.

The exhibition and its accompanying publication are made possible by the Evergreen House Foundation and the Municipal Arts Society of Baltimore. Additional funding is provided by the Hecht- Levi Foundation, Cindy and Tom Kelly, the Maryland State Arts Council, Jane and Worth Daniels, Constance R. Caplan, Joan I. Fabry and Michael Klein, and other generous contributors.
http://museums.jhu.edu/evergreen.php?section=exhibitions&exhibition=simultaneous-presence